Best Moving Company in Johns Island

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Too Big? Too Heavy? We’ve Got Strong Men to Help!

Too Big? Too Heavy? We’ve Got Strong Men To Help!

If you have ever moved to a new house, apartment, or office by yourself, you know how much of a pain it can be. The moving process can be filled with many different emotions. On the one hand, you’re probably excited about the new adventure that lies ahead of you. On the other hand, you’re probably dreading the heavy lifting, pulling, packing, organizing, and logistical aspects of moving.

At Strong Men Moving, our goal is to remove that dread so you can focus on the fun and productive times ahead. With a team of hardworking, experienced moving professionals on your side, moving to a new home or office is easy, like Sunday morning.

The best part? As local, trusted movers in Johns Island, you won’t have to take a loan out from the bank to pay for our moving services. We believe in hard work, friendly attitudes, efficiency, and fair pricing.

Service Areas

Service
Convenience is King

Convenience is King

Strong Men Moving is a full-service moving company in Johns Island. We run our trucks at 110%, meaning we go above and beyond what other movers in Johns Island are willing to do.

Are you moving from out of state? Is your new house hard to find? Don’t have the time or patience to pack and wrap all of your belongings? Don’t sweat it – we’ve got your back. There’s no job that’s too large or too small for our strong men to handle, and there’s no place in the Lowcountry that we won’t go for you.

When we say convenience is king, we mean it.  We’re talking nights, weekends, and availability 24-hours a day from Monday through Saturday. Our goal is to make your move as stress-free and simple as possible. That way, you have time to focus on enjoying your new home or office, while we worry about hauling your double vanity into the back of our truck.

When you bring in the Strong Men, you can rest assured that you’re getting a full-service, friendly experience from the minute we pull into your driveway to the minute we shake your hand goodbye. Unlike some moving companies in Johns Island, punctuality is not our poison. We strive to arrive on time to each job that we are hired to perform.

Here are some of the most popular moving services our customers use:

Residential Moving

Residential Moving

Along with divorce and the loss of a job, moving is listed as one of the most stressful experiences a person can go through in their lifetime. When you consider the packing, the lifting, the scheduling, and the general disruption that moving can have on your life, it’s easy to understand why.

As the premier moving company in Johns Island, our goal is to carry your moving burden, so you can stay focused on your daily life. You can rest easy knowing our movers in Johns Island will always show up to your home with a positive attitude, friendly smile, and motivation to work. We treat your property like it was our own and take great care in handling all the items we move for you.

In addition, we prep our team of movers for many situations and provide thorough training on the fundamentals of moving, packing, risk management, and more.

If you own specialty items such as art, antiques, or other valuables, we will take every precaution necessary to ensure your possessions arrive to your new home safe and sound.

Whether you’re moving to a new home down the street or are coming from another state, we have the experience, tools, and professional movers to do the job correctly. We even offer additional residential moving services that include packing, unpacking, overnight storage, and much more.

Call or text us today to discover the full range of our residential moving specialties.

Labor-Only Moving

Labor-Only Moving

Do you already have reliable transportation but still need a team of professional movers to handle your heavy lifting? Strong Men Moving now offers labor-only moving services in Johns Island for both residential and commercial moving projects.

A few benefits of labor-only moving include:

  • Reduce damage – our professional movers in Johns Island will make sure your belongings are properly loaded into your truck, reducing the probability of damaged or broken items.
  • Maximize Space – With years of experience in the moving industry, we have a sixth sense for space-efficient packing and loading. Our strong men will make the most out of your truck’s usable space, which can help reduce trip time and save money on gas.
  • Quicker Moves – A team of Strong Men Moving will almost always be able to load and unload your belongings faster than a group of your friends. It’s nothing personal! With our team of professionals, you can spend less time filling up your truck and more time on getting to your new home or office.
  • Save Money – Using your friends to help you move almost certainly means you will have to compensate them one way or another. Why spend your money on cases of beer and pizza when you can use it for a safer, quicker move?
Commercial Moving

Commercial Moving

Johns Island and the surrounding metropolitan area is a hot spot for business. Dozens of companies scout Johns Island each year as a new place to call home, where they can broaden their horizons and find new clients. What some businesses do not take into account is the logistics and headaches involved with moving to a new location.

Strong Men Moving has built a reputation as a leader in commercial moving services in Johns Island. We have the tools, team, and experience necessary to facilitate a smooth move for your business at a reasonable price.

In our experience as a commercial moving company in Johns Island, we have discovered that it can be complicated to move to a new business location. During this transition, we know that you need:

  • Your office furniture, equipment, and supplies packed and secured safely
  • Storage space
  • A detailed, efficient plan of action to ensure an organized move
  • Minimal disruptions to your day-to-day operations

To make sure we meet the requirements above, we will speak with you at length about your upcoming commercial business relocation. That way, we get a better understanding of the logistics involved. We will also provide you with a free quote, so you can plan your budget ahead of time.

At Strong Men Moving, some common commercial moving services include:

  • Pickup and delivery of your office equipment and supplies
  • Loading and unloading office items
  • Packing and unpacking your office supplies
  • Assembly of your office furniture
  • Provide all necessary moving equipment and packing materials

Whether you have to move a few office chairs down the street or need help transitioning to a new location, we are here to serve.

Refuse Removal and Disposal

Refuse Removal and Disposal

Did you find a bunch of unwanted junk after moving to a new office? Do you have an old, stinky couch taking up room in your basement? Don’t sweat it – we will remove the old junk from your home or office quicker than you can say, “trash it!”

With Strong Men Moving’s refuse removal services, we can haul away all the heavy, unusable items that your trash service won’t pick up.

A few common junk removal items that we can remove for you are:

  • Couches
  • Chairs
  • Bed frames
  • Futons
  • Dressers
  • Mattresses
Professional Packing

Professional Packing

If you’re like most average folks living in the U.S., you probably have hundreds of items lying around your house that need to be packed before you can move to a new home. Packing can be a massive source of frustration, especially for busy families and professionals who don’t have the time or patience to pack.

Why risk a sprained back or a throbbing headache when Strong Men Moving can handle all the packing for you? With our professional packing services in Johns Island, you can sit back and sip some sweet tea while we pack your keepsakes, furniture, electronics, clothes, and more. If you have valuable items like family heirlooms or fragile china, we will take extra care to make sure those items stay safe and unbroken during your upcoming move.

Why hire a moving company in Johns Island like Strong Men Moving to help you pack? Here’s why most of our clients want us to pack for them:

  • Packing is a tedious, time-consuming chore
  • Professional packing minimizes the risk of injury
  • Professional packing reduces the risk of damaged items
  • Professional packing lets you focus on the more important aspects of moving, like setting up HVAC or internet service

Don’t have many items to pack this time around? Ask us about our high-quality packing supplies like boxes, tape, furniture pads, and covers. We’re here to help in any way that we can!

Cleanout Services

Cleanout Services

If you have a large-scale cleanout project, we can help with that, too. Our home and commercial cleanout services are great if you need to dispose of a large number of items in a short period of time.

All you have to do is give us a call, and we’ll come to your location to remove your unwanted items, taking care not to damage your home or office. Once we have removed your refuse, we’ll dispose of it in an environmentally-friendly fashion to help protect the Lowcountry we love so much.

A few common cleanout services in Johns Island include:

  • Estate cleanouts
  • House cleanouts
  • Basement cleanouts
  • Garage cleanouts
  • Foreclosure cleanouts
  • Apartment cleanouts
  • Office cleanouts
  • Commercial space cleanouts
  • Storage space cleanouts

General Labor Services

Are you working on a project that requires a team of strong laborers? Sometimes, hiring your friends just doesn’t cut it. When you need a team that arrives on time, works hard, and does so with a smile, Strong Men Moving has got the help you need! As trusted movers in Johns Island, we employ seasoned labor professionals that can assist you with your next indoor or outdoor project. Ready to get started? Call or text us today so that we can get a good understanding of your upcoming project, and how our team can save you time, effort, and money.

Get Help Now

About Strong Men Moving

Established in 2019, Strong Men Moving has quickly become a leading moving company in Johns Island, SC. We have built our reputation on reliability, performance, price, and a positive attitude. We truly feel privileged to serve the residents of South Carolina. Our goal is to provide quality customer service with speed and diligence to all clients. We treat all of our customers the same, whether they hire us for a multi-facility commercial move or just need help loading and unloading a moving truck.

About Strong Men Moving

Strong Men Moving offers service in the following communities and beyond:

  • Bluffton
  • Charleston
  • Columbia
  • Daniel Island
  • Folly Beach
  • Greenville
  • Hanahan
  • Hilton Head Island
  • Isle of Palms
  • James Island
  • Johns Island
  • Kiawah Island
  • Ladson
  • Mount Pleasant
  • Myrtle Beach
  • Nexton
  • North Charleston
  • Seabrook Island
  • Sullivan’s Island
  • Summerville
  • West Ashley

Do you have questions?

Need a quote on your upcoming residential or commercial move? We are here to help however
possible. You can reach us via phone at 843-830-6305 or by email at [email protected].

We hope to hear from you soon!

Latest News in Johns Island

Friends and family of missing boater handing out life jackets to other boaters in his honor

WADMALAW ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – As the search continues for a missing boater near Wadmalaw Island, his friends and family are working to keep other boaters safe in his honor.Logan Wood, 18, was duck-hunting on the Edisto River on January 13 when he went missing.Wood’s family and friends told News 2 that he loved fishing and hunting and spent much of his time on the water.Shortly after Wood went missing, a ...

WADMALAW ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – As the search continues for a missing boater near Wadmalaw Island, his friends and family are working to keep other boaters safe in his honor.

Logan Wood, 18, was duck-hunting on the Edisto River on January 13 when he went missing.

Wood’s family and friends told News 2 that he loved fishing and hunting and spent much of his time on the water.

Shortly after Wood went missing, a GoFundMe was started to help his family with immediate expenses. As of Thursday, the fundraiser had already brought in over $25,000.

Wood’s family is now teaming up with West Marine in West Ashley to purchase discounted life vests to hand out to other boaters.

West Marine’s assistant manager, Sarah Horres, met Wood during his many visits to the store. She helped coordinate the partnership.

“He literally sat at the register with me for about an hour and we talked about his boat and everything. We became friends from there,” said Horres.

She said West Marine is contributing over 140 life jackets to the cause.

Wood’s family is planning to distribute the jackets at local boat landings, starting next week. They hope to prevent other situations like this from happening.

“If one person wears it, and we find them, then it did its job,” said Kim Ambrose.

Ambrose is a close family friend. She said Wood was the best fisherman she knew and said she was shocked to hear he never returned.

Moving forward, she said his family plans to use the money to host a fishing tournament in the spring. They also hope to start a scholarship for children at Camp Woodie, to encourage kids to go out and enjoy the outdoors just like Wood did.

Ambrose said West Marine is also offering discounted life vests to customers who mention Wood’s name at checkout.

If you would like to donate to the GoFundMe, click here. You can also make a donation at Pinnacle Bank on Johns Island.

Ambrose said Wood’s friends and family will not stop searching until he is back home.

Commentary: Johns Islanders are making a difference in guiding the island’s growth

On Johns Island, one often gets the impression that the 80% of the island that is still rural eventually will be built out the same way Maybank Highway has been — and that there’s nothing any of us can do to stop it.The reality is that when Johns Islanders get engaged, they can and do make a difference. As a new year begins, it’s a good time to reflect on the progress we made in 2021 to ensure a mostly rural future for the island.First, we need to understand two key land-use policies.In 1999, Charleston...

On Johns Island, one often gets the impression that the 80% of the island that is still rural eventually will be built out the same way Maybank Highway has been — and that there’s nothing any of us can do to stop it.

The reality is that when Johns Islanders get engaged, they can and do make a difference. As a new year begins, it’s a good time to reflect on the progress we made in 2021 to ensure a mostly rural future for the island.

First, we need to understand two key land-use policies.

In 1999, Charleston County defined an urban growth boundary that separated the urban/suburban portions of the county from the rural portions. About 20% of Johns Island lies inside the boundary and is designated to be urban/suburban; the remaining 80% is designated to be rural.

Then in 2006, the St. John’s Water Company and the Charleston Water System signed an agreement stating that sewer service on Johns Island would be provided only within a designated service area, which approximates the urban/suburban area within the urban growth boundary.

The area outside the growth boundary is zoned for rural densities ranging from one house per acre to one house per eight acres, which serves to block dense suburban-type developments. The lack of sewer service further blocks them.

Johns Islanders and the local conservation community have worked during the past 20 years to prevent most changes to the growth boundary, ensuring the island won’t be “built out.”

In 2021, the county proposed to increase housing densities outside the boundary that would have allowed up to 8,000 more houses on an island that had 10,217 in 2020. Johns Islanders took the lead to ensure this proposal was withdrawn. Johns Islanders made a difference.

Johns Islanders worked with the county and the conservation community on the 2021 update to the county’s zoning regulations so that wetlands are now excluded from the density calculations (thereby eliminating the potential construction of 3,000 houses). Restrictions on sand mines have been tightened to improve our quality of life, and the requirements for conservation subdivisions were revised to emphasize conservation. Johns Islanders made a difference.

Johns Islanders worked with the Charleston City Council in 2021 on a new comprehensive plan that supports elevation-based zoning that is critically needed on the island and on creating a municipal improvement district that will let us raise money to improve our transportation, parks and drainage infrastructure. Johns Islanders made a difference.

Johns Islanders were concerned about a proposed development at the mouth of Burden Creek, just north of the Johns Island airport, which could worsen flooding. Last year, islanders and the conservation community worked with the Charleston County Aviation Authority for the authority to purchase the land. All parties collaborated to place a conservation easement on the land that will eliminate the construction of 240 additional houses. Johns Islanders made a difference.

In 2020-2021, Johns Islanders worked with the county on the Main Road and Maybank Highway overlay districts. The Main Road overlay ensures that commercial development on Main Road fits into the rural character of Johns Island. The Maybank Highway overlay reinforces the concept of commercial nodes separated by residential development so Maybank Highway doesn’t become one long strip mall. It also restricts big-box stores. Johns Islanders made a difference.

Over the years, private landowners as well as city, county and federal governments have put more than 3,700 acres on Johns Island under easements. This has eliminated the construction of more than 1,200 additional houses. Private landowners could have sold to developers; instead they chose to make a difference to help ensure Johns Island stays mostly rural.

Yes, the 20% of Johns Island within the urban growth boundary eventually will be built out.

But for the rural 80% of Johns Island, it isn’t too late: We are doing something about development, and we are making a difference.

Many thanks to all Johns Islanders who value the farms, forests and people who make this mostly rural sea island such a special place. And thanks to all who continue to make a difference on Johns Island, especially the conservation community and our neighbors on Kiawah, Seabrook and Wadmalaw islands.

Our efforts can never cease, but when we stand together, we can ensure that the Johns Island we all love will be here for many future generations.

John Zlogar is a Johns Island resident and chairman of the Johns Island Task Force.

Letters: Johns Island development is leading to dangerous potholes, accidents

An article in the Dec. 5 Post and Courier noted that a developer wants to build a multifamily development on 47 acres on Maybank Highway.This is extremely disturbing to the residents of Johns Island.Due to the rapid, out-of-control development of the island, residents are experiencing a very negative effect on our quality of life and our safety.Our roads are in terrible condition due to the excessive traffic, including heavy dump trucks for which the roads clearly weren’t designedThis has led to numerous dan...

An article in the Dec. 5 Post and Courier noted that a developer wants to build a multifamily development on 47 acres on Maybank Highway.

This is extremely disturbing to the residents of Johns Island.

Due to the rapid, out-of-control development of the island, residents are experiencing a very negative effect on our quality of life and our safety.

Our roads are in terrible condition due to the excessive traffic, including heavy dump trucks for which the roads clearly weren’t designed

This has led to numerous dangerous potholes and vehicle accidents.

There were 69 car fatalities in Charleston County in 2020, a number of which were on Johns Island.

A recent study conducted by Insurify Insights found that Johns Island has the most accident-prone drivers in the United States.

Due to the heavy traffic, it is difficult for emergency vehicles to get to their destination in a safe, timely manner.

Flooding has increased as trees are clear-cut from property and are replaced with asphalt, multiple apartment complexes and homes.

The last thing we need is 47 more acres of tree-filled land to be turned into more multifamily development.

A recent letter to the editor pointed out that the residents of Johns Island have been pleading to the city of Charleston and Charleston County to stop approving more development until we can get the infrastructure in place to support the existing residents.

Our pleas fall on deaf ears.

JEANNE WILLIAMS

Johns Island

Two letters published in the Dec. 12 Post and Courier expressed concerns about two unrelated subjects.

A Wadmalaw Island resident wrote about the relentless development of what was once pristine rural land around the tri-county area. I sympathized because the same song is being sung seemingly everywhere in the Lowcountry.

The second letter talked about the teacher shortage and how it is negatively affecting our quality of life.

That letter listed a number of suggestions to help alleviate the shortage. Several items involved needing more support and awareness from local and state politicians.

I rarely see any explanation or rebuttal to these letters from any of our legislators or council members. I would love to see them explain to the public in writing how they think relentless development is making our lives better.

And please don’t keep saying it’s for a bigger tax base.

Our teachers need increased support. They are an investment in our future and we should start taking note of that.

I encourage council members and legislators to respond to these issues.

Their collective silence to issues voiced by the public makes it seem like they don’t hear our complaints and concerns.

EDDIE COLLINS

Mount Pleasant

It seems that every time Charleston experiences a flood event, many point to climate change.

Land subsidence, another important component to sea level change, is rarely mentioned. Subsidence is largely a natural process, but it has a significant human component.

As development in the Lowcountry has exploded and demand on groundwater has increased, aquifers are not recharging fast enough to prevent land above from sinking.

Another problem is the loss of wetlands that result in more runoff, intensifying soil erosion.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, sea level at Charleston Harbor has increased about 13 inches over the past century. But according to the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium, the land around Charleston has sunk about 5 inches over the same period. As development increases, so does the sinking.

We could spend billions of dollars to fight climate change, but for Charleston, it won’t solve the problem.

JOSEPH LEONARD

Charleston

About two months ago, I sent letters of complaint to the headquarters of a large health care organization with a Lowcountry presence.

The letters were addressed to a corporate officer and at least one to the local CEO.

The letters contained documented violations of health care regulations and a potential breach of patient health care information security.

One of the things specifically asked for was an audit of my health care record looking for unauthorized access.

I waited for a reply, an acknowledgement or some action. Nothing.

In the past, such complaints were met with at least a form letter in response and in most cases, some positive action.

Apparently not here, not now in today’s business world.

It seems as if the corporation isn’t interested in what consumers have to say.

I’m a bit frustrated but I won’t be going away anytime soon. I gave the organization a chance to self-correct; perhaps when the complaints start coming from its regulators it might start listening.

I find it ironic that this particular organization talks about being responsive and responsible in its literature. Perhaps the leaders should reacquaint themselves with their own code of ethics.

TIMOTHY C. KIEL

Mount Pleasant

The South Carolina Football Hall of Fame reveal class of 2021 finalists

GREENVILLE, S.C. —In the fall of 2021, 76 nominees were chosen that have played collegiate football for an in-state institution or grew up in South Carolina and played out of state with excellence during their full career. The vote was determined by sports media, the SCFHOF Board of Advisors and Directors, supporting members and fans of the South Carolina Football Hall of Fame (SCFHOF). The SCFHOF is proud to announce the final ballot consisting of 26 modern-era and four Legacy finalists eligible for a five-pers...

GREENVILLE, S.C. —

In the fall of 2021, 76 nominees were chosen that have played collegiate football for an in-state institution or grew up in South Carolina and played out of state with excellence during their full career. The vote was determined by sports media, the SCFHOF Board of Advisors and Directors, supporting members and fans of the South Carolina Football Hall of Fame (SCFHOF). The SCFHOF is proud to announce the final ballot consisting of 26 modern-era and four Legacy finalists eligible for a five-person class to be enshrined at the 9th Annual Enshrinement & Benefit scheduled for March 31, 2022 at the Hilton Greenville.

The 26 modern day finalists have ties to in-state programs including the University of South Carolina, Clemson University, The Citadel, South Carolina State, Furman, Newberry, and Wofford. Nine of those finalists grew up in the state and played their college ball at an out-of-state program. The four Legacy finalists represent Clemson University, Western Carolina, South Carolina State University, and the University of South Carolina.

Class of 2021 Modern Era Finalists (Alphabetical Order):

1. Terry Allen(Commerce GA, Clemson ’86-’89, Minnesota Vikings ’91-’94 (9th Rnd Draft Pick), Washington Redskins ’95-’98, New England Patriots ’99, New Orleans Saints ’00, Baltimore Ravens ’01, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘15)

2. Mike Ayers: (Georgetown KY, Georgetown (KY) '66-''69, Assist Coach: Georgetown, Newberry, Wofford, Richmond HC: ETSU '85-'87, Wofford'88-'17, 218-160-2 overall HC record, 5x SoCon Champion, 8-8 FCS Playoff record)

3. Jeff Bostic (Greensboro NC, Clemson ’76-‘79, Washington Redskins ’80-’93. 3x Super Bowl Champion, All Pro ’83, Pro Bowl ’83, Washington Redskins Ring of Fame, made 70 Greatest Redskins list, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘95)

4. Joe Bostic (Greensboro NC, Clemson ’75-’78, St. Louis/Phoenix Cardinals ’79-’88 (3rd Rnd Draft Pick), 2x Clemson All-American, Older brother of Jeff Bostic, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘10)

5. Peter Boulware (Columbia, SC; Florida State ’93-’96, Baltimore Ravens ’97-’05 (1st Rnd Draft Pick), Pro Bowl ’98, ’99, ’02, ’03, All-Pro ’99, NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year Award ’97, Super Bowl XXXV Champion, AFC Sacks Leader ‘01)

6. Troy Brown (Barnwell SC, Marshall ’89-’92, New England Patriots ’93-’07 (8th Rnd Draft Pick), 3x Super Bowl Champion, Pro Bowl ’01, New England Patriots Hall of Fame/50thAnniversary Team, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘16)

7. Dexter Coakley (Mt. Pleasant SC, Appalachian St. ’93-’96, Dallas Cowboys ’97-’04 (3rd Rnd Draft Pick), St. Louis Rams ’05-’06, SoCon Freshman of the Year, 3x SoCon DPOY ’94-’96, 2x Buck Buchanan Award ’95, ’96, ’97 NFL All-Rookie team, 3x Pro Bowl ’99, ’01, ’03, College Football Hall of Fame ‘11, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘19)

8. Ben Coates (Greenwood SC, Livingstone College ’88-’91, New England Patriots ’91-’99 (5th Rnd Draft Pick), Baltimore Ravens ’00, 5x Pro Bowl ’94-’98, 3x All-Pro 1st Team ’94, ’95, 2nd Team ’98, Super Bowl Champion (XXXV), NFL 1990’s All-Decade Team, New England Patriots Hall of Fame ’08, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘15)

9. Woody Dantzler (Orangeburg SC, Clemson ’97-’01, Dallas Cowboys ’02, ’05, Atlanta Falcons ’02, First QB in NCAA history to pass for 2,000 yards and rush for 1,000 in same season, held 53 Clemson football records)

10. Brad Edwards (Lumberton NC, South Carolina ’84-’87, Minnesota Vikings ’88-’89 (2nd Rnd Draft Pick), Washington Redskins ’90-’93, Atlanta Falcons ’94-’96, Super Bowl XXVI Champion, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ’11, Athletic Director (AD): Newberry College, Jacksonville University Current: AD for George Mason University)

11. James “Jumpy” Geathers (Georgetown SC, Wichita St ’80-’83, New Orleans Saints ’84-’89 (2ndRnd Draft Pick), Washington Redskins ’90-’92, Atlanta Falcons ’93-95, Denver Broncos ’96-’97, Super Bowl XXVI Champion)

12. John Gilliam (Greenwood SC, SC State ’63-66, New Orleans Saints ’67-’68 (2ndRnd Draft Pick), St. Louis Cardinals ’69-’71, Minnesota Vikings ’72-’74, ’75, Atlanta Falcons ’76, Chicago Bears ’77, New Orleans Saints ’77, 4 x Pro Bowl selection ’72-’75, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘92)

13. Dwayne Harper (Orangeburg SC, SC State ’84-’87, Seattle Seahawks ’88-’93 (11th Rnd Draft Pick), San Diego Chargers ’94-’98, Detroit Lions ’99, 24 career INTs, and 10 forced fumbles)

14. Stanford Jennings (Summerville SC, Furman’80-’83, Cincinnati Bengals ’84-’90 (3rd Rnd Draft Pick), New Orleans Saints ’91, Tampa Bay Buccaneers ’92, 1981 SoCon Player of the Year, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘06)

15. Terry Kinard (Bitburg West Germany, Sumter HS, Clemson ’79-’82, New York Giants ’83-’89 (1st Rnd Draft Pick), Houston Oilers ’90, Consensus All-American ’81, ’82, College Football Hall of Fame ’01, National Champion ’81, Pro Bowl ’88, Super Bowl Champion (XXI), Clemson all-time leader in interceptions (19), Clemson Ring of Honor ’01, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘02)

16. Marcus Lattimore (Duncan SC, South Carolina ’10-’12, San Francisco 49ers ’13-’14, USA Today HS All-American, NCAA Freshman of the Year ’10, Sporting News All-Freshman Team, 1st Team All-SEC ’10, 2ndTeam All-American, 2nd Team All-SEC ’11)

17. George Martin (Greenville SC, Oregon ’71-’74, New York Giants ’75-’88 (11thRnd Draft Pick), Super Bowl XXI Champion, scored 7 touchdowns (one lined up as a tight end) as a defensive lineman which is second to Jason Taylor in NFL history)

18. Stump Mitchell (Kingsland GA, The Citadel ’77-’80, St. Louis Cardinals ’81-’87 (9thRnd Draft Pick), Phoenix Cardinals ’88-’89, Kansas City Chiefs ’90 (player)/Head Coach: Morgan State ’96-’98, Southern ’10-‘12/Assistant: San Antonio Riders ’92, Morgan State ’95, Seattle Seahawks ’99-’07, Washington Redskins ’08-’09, Arizona Cardinals RB coach ’13- 17, New York Jets RB Coach 2017-2018, Cleveland Browns ’19 (current), South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘99)

19. Sidney Rice (Gaffney SC, South Carolina ’05-’06, Minnesota Vikings (2ndRnd Draft Pick) ’07-’10, Seattle Seahawks ’11-’13, Pro Bowl ’09, All-Pro ’09, Super Bowl XLVIII champion, NFL record for most touchdown receptions in a playoff game (3), U of SC Athletic Hall of Fame ’16, U of SC career TD reception record holder (23-tied))

20. Tony Rice (Greenwood SC, Notre Dame ’86-’89, Saskatchewan Roughriders ’90 (CFL), Barcelona Dragons ’91-’92 (World League), Munich Thunder ’94 (FLE), 1988 National Champion, ’89 Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award, ’89 4thin Heisman, ’89 All-American)

21. Brian Ruff (Mountainside NJ, Citadel ’69-’72, Baltimore Colts ’72 (11th Rnd Draft Pick), 3x All-SoCon ’74, ’75,’76, 2x SoCon Player of the Year ’75, ’76, SC Player of the Year ’75, ’76, 1st Team AP All-American ’72, Citadel retired his #51 jersey, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ’06, All-time leading tackler in SoCon history (755))

22. Rick Sanford (Rock Hill SC, South Carolina ’76-’79, New England Patriots ’79-’84 (1st Rnd Draft Pick), Seattle Seahawks ’85, NCAA All-American ’78, 1st UofSC player to be selected in 1stround of the NFL Draft, All-Pro ’83, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ’98)

23. Connor Shaw (Flowery Branch GA, South Carolina ’10-13, Cleveland Browns ’14-’15 (undrafted), Chicago Bears ’16, 2014 Capital One Bowl MVP, went 17-0 as a starter at home, and 27-5 overall, was starting quarterback of 3 straight 11-win seasons. Current: USC Director of Football Relations)

24. Clyde Simmons Jr. (Lane SC, Western Carolina ’82-’85, Philadelphia Eagles ’86-’93 (9thRnd Draft Pick), Arizona Cardinals ’94-’95, Jacksonville ’96-’97, Cincinnati Bengals ’98, Chicago Bears ’99-’00, 100 sack Club, 2x Pro Bowl/All-Pro ’91, ’92, Philadelphia Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, (coaching)LA Rams Asst. Def. Line Coach ’12-current)

25. CJ Spiller (Lake Burton FL, Clemson'06-'09, Buffalo Bills '10-'14 (1st Rnd Draft Pick), NO Saints '15-'16, Seahawks, Jets, Chiefs-'16-'17, All-American, CFB Hall '20, Pro Bowl '12 /Current: Clemson RB Coach)

26. Roddy White (James Island SC, UAB ‘01-’04, Atlanta Falcons (1st Rnd Draft Pick) ‘05-’15, 4x Pro Bowl, 1x First-Team All Pro, 2010 NFL Receptions Leader, Atlanta Falcons Ring of Honor)

Legacy Finalists:

1. Chester McGlockton(1969-2011, Whiteville NC, Clemson’88-’91, LA/Oakland Raiders (1st Rnd Draft Pick) ’92-’97, Kansas City Chiefs ’98-’00, Denver Broncos ’01-’02, New York Jets ’03, 4 x Pro Bowl ’94-’97, 3 x All-Pro ’94-’96, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘11)

2. Joe Morrison(1937-1989, Lima OH, Cincinnati ’55-’58, New York Giants (3rd Rnd Draft Pick) ’59-’72, Head Coach: Chattanooga ’73-’79, New Mexico ’80-’82, South Carolina’83-’88, Walter Camp Coach of the Year ’84, South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame ‘89)

3. Marion Motley(1920-1999, Leesburg GA, SC State ’39, Nevada ’41-’43, Cleveland Browns ’46-’53, Pittsburgh Steelers ’55, NFL Champion ’50, Pro Bowl ’50, NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, 4 x AAFC Champion ’46-’49, Pro Football Hall of Fame ’68)

4. David Patten (1974-2021, Hopkins SC, Western Carolina ’92-’95, New York Giants ’97-’99, Cleveland Browns ’00, ‘09, New England Patriots ’01-’04, ‘10, Washington Redskins ’05-’06, New Orleans Saints ’07-’08, 3x Super Bowl Champion (XXXVI, XXXVIII, XXXIX))

Pandemic boosted pursuit for SC driver’s license tests toward private sector

Getting a driver’s license can be an exciting milestone or a loathsome task depending on the circumstances, but during the COVID-19 pandemic it became one more thing: a potential health threat.Sitting in a small, enclosed space with someone who is neither a close friend nor a family member is typically what getting a driver’s license requires. And that was a pandemic no-no. So for most of 2020 and 2021, South Carolina did not allow state examiners to ride with license applicants for driving tests.The result? More bu...

Getting a driver’s license can be an exciting milestone or a loathsome task depending on the circumstances, but during the COVID-19 pandemic it became one more thing: a potential health threat.

Sitting in a small, enclosed space with someone who is neither a close friend nor a family member is typically what getting a driver’s license requires. And that was a pandemic no-no. So for most of 2020 and 2021, South Carolina did not allow state examiners to ride with license applicants for driving tests.

The result? More business flowed to private driving schools, which in South Carolina are allowed to conduct tests and approve students for a driver’s license.

“It got us very busy,” said Anthony Fralix, an owner and instructor at James Island Driving School. “Since the DMV wasn’t doing testing, it sent a lot of business to us.”

The Department of Motor Vehicles didn’t actually stop testing, but the road tests required for a license were only offered at DMV offices that had on-site driving courses where officials could watch applicants drive through the series of tests from outside the vehicle.

“They were held to the same standards and we had policies in place to address that,” said Kyle McGahee, the DMV’s chief of strategic communications and community affairs. “It was just in a parking lot.”

Previously, license applicants who went to a state facility would be tested with a DMV examiner in the car, usually on public roads following planned routes.

When concerns about the virus prompted a change in policy — no DMV examiners in cars with applicants — license testing was limited to roughly half the DMV’s 66 locations that had “testing pads” with driving courses on site and by appointment only.

“We did have a lot of questions and some people said they were having trouble finding appointments near them,” said Cindy Hutto, the agency’s driver’s licenses standards manager. “Even though it was in half the number of sites, the staffing was moved and we were running road tests throughout the day.”

In-car testing at DMV offices was halted from May 2020 to June 1, 2021, then halted again from September to mid-November 2021 after the delta variant caused a surge in COVID cases nationwide. In-car testing has since resumed and appointments are no longer required.

At Rusty’s Driving School in Mount Pleasant, owner Rusty Hires said he briefly shut down his business in 2020 for only the third time in 35 years — the other two being Hurricane Hugo in 1989 and the 2018 winter storm that closed roads and Charleston International Airport.

After about a month, Hires reopened for business with COVID-19 restrictions in place.

“We reduced our class sizes and mandated masks,” Hires. said “Very few of our clients objected.”

Rusty’s Driving School continued to do in-car license testing, and Hires said they picked up lots of business.

“Even before the pandemic we had driver training schools that were testing drivers,” said Hutto. “From the kid’s perspective, they might be more comfortable testing with the people who trained them.”

Detailed statistics on the number of road tests conducted by private businesses were unavailable from the state, partly because of a change in the way they are reported. Regardless of who conducts the test, the DMV issues the license.

In the pandemic years of 2020 and 2021 the DMV issued, respectively, 39,467 and 38,933 regular (non-commercial) licenses that would have required driving tests. In 2019, the last full year before the pandemic, 36,514 were issued.

At least in the greater Charleston area, where population growth has been driven by people moving from other states, it’s not just teens seeking licenses.

“You’ve got a lot of people who moved here, like from New York, and had never learned to drive,” Fralix said. Those drivers, he said, are about half his clients.

Hires said a sizeable portion of the business is older residents who moved to the area.

“Some have a license and just want a little improvement, and some never drove because they could walk out their door and jump on a train or a bus,” he said.

The omicron variant has sent COVID-19 cases soaring once again, but this time the DMV has announced no restrictions on in-car driver’s license testing.

However, some offices are offering limited services due to staffing issues.

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