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Too Big? Too Heavy? We’ve Got Strong Men to Help!

Too Big? Too Heavy? We’ve Got Strong Men To Help!

If you have ever moved to a new house, apartment, or office by yourself, you know how much of a pain it can be. The moving process can be filled with many different emotions. On the one hand, you’re probably excited about the new adventure that lies ahead of you. On the other hand, you’re probably dreading the heavy lifting, pulling, packing, organizing, and logistical aspects of moving.

At Strong Men Moving, our goal is to remove that dread so you can focus on the fun and productive times ahead. With a team of hardworking, experienced moving professionals on your side, moving to a new home or office is easy, like Sunday morning.

The best part? As local, trusted movers in Johns Island, you won’t have to take a loan out from the bank to pay for our moving services. We believe in hard work, friendly attitudes, efficiency, and fair pricing.

Service Areas

Service
Convenience is King

Convenience is King

Strong Men Moving is a full-service moving company in Johns Island. We run our trucks at 110%, meaning we go above and beyond what other movers in Johns Island are willing to do.

Are you moving from out of state? Is your new house hard to find? Don’t have the time or patience to pack and wrap all of your belongings? Don’t sweat it – we’ve got your back. There’s no job that’s too large or too small for our strong men to handle, and there’s no place in the Lowcountry that we won’t go for you.

When we say convenience is king, we mean it.  We’re talking nights, weekends, and availability 24-hours a day from Monday through Saturday. Our goal is to make your move as stress-free and simple as possible. That way, you have time to focus on enjoying your new home or office, while we worry about hauling your double vanity into the back of our truck.

When you bring in the Strong Men, you can rest assured that you’re getting a full-service, friendly experience from the minute we pull into your driveway to the minute we shake your hand goodbye. Unlike some moving companies in Johns Island, punctuality is not our poison. We strive to arrive on time to each job that we are hired to perform.

Here are some of the most popular moving services our customers use:

Residential Moving

Residential Moving

Along with divorce and the loss of a job, moving is listed as one of the most stressful experiences a person can go through in their lifetime. When you consider the packing, the lifting, the scheduling, and the general disruption that moving can have on your life, it’s easy to understand why.

As the premier moving company in Johns Island, our goal is to carry your moving burden, so you can stay focused on your daily life. You can rest easy knowing our movers in Johns Island will always show up to your home with a positive attitude, friendly smile, and motivation to work. We treat your property like it was our own and take great care in handling all the items we move for you.

In addition, we prep our team of movers for many situations and provide thorough training on the fundamentals of moving, packing, risk management, and more.

If you own specialty items such as art, antiques, or other valuables, we will take every precaution necessary to ensure your possessions arrive to your new home safe and sound.

Whether you’re moving to a new home down the street or are coming from another state, we have the experience, tools, and professional movers to do the job correctly. We even offer additional residential moving services that include packing, unpacking, overnight storage, and much more.

Call or text us today to discover the full range of our residential moving specialties.

Labor-Only Moving

Labor-Only Moving

Do you already have reliable transportation but still need a team of professional movers to handle your heavy lifting? Strong Men Moving now offers labor-only moving services in Johns Island for both residential and commercial moving projects.

A few benefits of labor-only moving include:

  • Reduce damage – our professional movers in Johns Island will make sure your belongings are properly loaded into your truck, reducing the probability of damaged or broken items.
  • Maximize Space – With years of experience in the moving industry, we have a sixth sense for space-efficient packing and loading. Our strong men will make the most out of your truck’s usable space, which can help reduce trip time and save money on gas.
  • Quicker Moves – A team of Strong Men Moving will almost always be able to load and unload your belongings faster than a group of your friends. It’s nothing personal! With our team of professionals, you can spend less time filling up your truck and more time on getting to your new home or office.
  • Save Money – Using your friends to help you move almost certainly means you will have to compensate them one way or another. Why spend your money on cases of beer and pizza when you can use it for a safer, quicker move?
Commercial Moving

Commercial Moving

Johns Island and the surrounding metropolitan area is a hot spot for business. Dozens of companies scout Johns Island each year as a new place to call home, where they can broaden their horizons and find new clients. What some businesses do not take into account is the logistics and headaches involved with moving to a new location.

Strong Men Moving has built a reputation as a leader in commercial moving services in Johns Island. We have the tools, team, and experience necessary to facilitate a smooth move for your business at a reasonable price.

In our experience as a commercial moving company in Johns Island, we have discovered that it can be complicated to move to a new business location. During this transition, we know that you need:

  • Your office furniture, equipment, and supplies packed and secured safely
  • Storage space
  • A detailed, efficient plan of action to ensure an organized move
  • Minimal disruptions to your day-to-day operations

To make sure we meet the requirements above, we will speak with you at length about your upcoming commercial business relocation. That way, we get a better understanding of the logistics involved. We will also provide you with a free quote, so you can plan your budget ahead of time.

At Strong Men Moving, some common commercial moving services include:

  • Pickup and delivery of your office equipment and supplies
  • Loading and unloading office items
  • Packing and unpacking your office supplies
  • Assembly of your office furniture
  • Provide all necessary moving equipment and packing materials

Whether you have to move a few office chairs down the street or need help transitioning to a new location, we are here to serve.

Refuse Removal and Disposal

Refuse Removal and Disposal

Did you find a bunch of unwanted junk after moving to a new office? Do you have an old, stinky couch taking up room in your basement? Don’t sweat it – we will remove the old junk from your home or office quicker than you can say, “trash it!”

With Strong Men Moving’s refuse removal services, we can haul away all the heavy, unusable items that your trash service won’t pick up.

A few common junk removal items that we can remove for you are:

  • Couches
  • Chairs
  • Bed frames
  • Futons
  • Dressers
  • Mattresses
Professional Packing

Professional Packing

If you’re like most average folks living in the U.S., you probably have hundreds of items lying around your house that need to be packed before you can move to a new home. Packing can be a massive source of frustration, especially for busy families and professionals who don’t have the time or patience to pack.

Why risk a sprained back or a throbbing headache when Strong Men Moving can handle all the packing for you? With our professional packing services in Johns Island, you can sit back and sip some sweet tea while we pack your keepsakes, furniture, electronics, clothes, and more. If you have valuable items like family heirlooms or fragile china, we will take extra care to make sure those items stay safe and unbroken during your upcoming move.

Why hire a moving company in Johns Island like Strong Men Moving to help you pack? Here’s why most of our clients want us to pack for them:

  • Packing is a tedious, time-consuming chore
  • Professional packing minimizes the risk of injury
  • Professional packing reduces the risk of damaged items
  • Professional packing lets you focus on the more important aspects of moving, like setting up HVAC or internet service

Don’t have many items to pack this time around? Ask us about our high-quality packing supplies like boxes, tape, furniture pads, and covers. We’re here to help in any way that we can!

Cleanout Services

Cleanout Services

If you have a large-scale cleanout project, we can help with that, too. Our home and commercial cleanout services are great if you need to dispose of a large number of items in a short period of time.

All you have to do is give us a call, and we’ll come to your location to remove your unwanted items, taking care not to damage your home or office. Once we have removed your refuse, we’ll dispose of it in an environmentally-friendly fashion to help protect the Lowcountry we love so much.

A few common cleanout services in Johns Island include:

  • Estate cleanouts
  • House cleanouts
  • Basement cleanouts
  • Garage cleanouts
  • Foreclosure cleanouts
  • Apartment cleanouts
  • Office cleanouts
  • Commercial space cleanouts
  • Storage space cleanouts

General Labor Services

Are you working on a project that requires a team of strong laborers? Sometimes, hiring your friends just doesn’t cut it. When you need a team that arrives on time, works hard, and does so with a smile, Strong Men Moving has got the help you need! As trusted movers in Johns Island, we employ seasoned labor professionals that can assist you with your next indoor or outdoor project. Ready to get started? Call or text us today so that we can get a good understanding of your upcoming project, and how our team can save you time, effort, and money.

Get Help Now

About Strong Men Moving

Established in 2019, Strong Men Moving has quickly become a leading moving company in Johns Island, SC. We have built our reputation on reliability, performance, price, and a positive attitude. We truly feel privileged to serve the residents of South Carolina. Our goal is to provide quality customer service with speed and diligence to all clients. We treat all of our customers the same, whether they hire us for a multi-facility commercial move or just need help loading and unloading a moving truck.

About Strong Men Moving

Strong Men Moving offers service in the following communities and beyond:

  • Bluffton
  • Charleston
  • Columbia
  • Daniel Island
  • Folly Beach
  • Greenville
  • Hanahan
  • Hilton Head Island
  • Isle of Palms
  • James Island
  • Johns Island
  • Kiawah Island
  • Ladson
  • Mount Pleasant
  • Myrtle Beach
  • Nexton
  • North Charleston
  • Seabrook Island
  • Sullivan’s Island
  • Summerville
  • West Ashley

Do you have questions?

Need a quote on your upcoming residential or commercial move? We are here to help however
possible. You can reach us via phone at 843-830-6305 or by email at [email protected].

We hope to hear from you soon!

Latest News in Johns Island

New taxing district aims to boost Johns Island infrastructure funds

On Johns Island, longtime residents’ complicated relationship with change is nothing new.Devonne Hammond, manager of Fields Farm Market on River Road, said growth on the historically rural island feels inevitable. Hammond grew up on his family’s 40-acre farm and moved away for college but eventually found his way back to an island that looked different than the one of his youth.“I don’t know if I can reasonably think of any place where growth doesn’t mean change for some people,” Hammond said...

On Johns Island, longtime residents’ complicated relationship with change is nothing new.

Devonne Hammond, manager of Fields Farm Market on River Road, said growth on the historically rural island feels inevitable. Hammond grew up on his family’s 40-acre farm and moved away for college but eventually found his way back to an island that looked different than the one of his youth.

“I don’t know if I can reasonably think of any place where growth doesn’t mean change for some people,” Hammond said. “I just hope it doesn’t have as much of a negative impact on our residents as we might expect.”

The farm has been in his family since Reconstruction, when formerly enslaved laborers took over former plantations on Johns Island.

“Its not until you move away that you see everything people go through to attain what my family already has,” Hammond said.

From 2010 to 2020, census data shows the island’s population within Charleston city limits doubled from nearly 5,300 residents to almost 12,000.

A new taxing district established by the city of Charleston aims to use funding from the island’s commercial and residential growth to help ease its growing pains like lagging road and drainage infrastructure.

The district, approved by City Council Oct. 12, places a tax on new development on the part of the island that falls within Charleston city limits to help fund municipal projects. It doesn’t apply to any existing developments or developments that were in the permitting process at the time of the council vote.

“Folks view development on the island as coming before the infrastructure,” said John Zlogar, chairman of the Johns Island Task Force. The task force was established in 2013 to bring together residents and local officials to address Johns Island-specific issues.

At one point, City Council considered a six-month moratorium on new housing on Johns Island proposed by Mayor John Tecklenburg. He advocated for the proposal as a way for the city to catch up on long-needed infrastructure improvements. After a mixed response, the 2018 proposal failed.

Over its 30-year lifespan, the newly approved taxing district, known as a Municipal Improvement District or MID, is projected to generate $60 million of additional revenue specifically for Johns Island, consultants hired by the city estimate. Developers will pay $480 per year per new apartment unit or single-family home. New individual single-family homes that are not part of subdivision will only be subject to the $480 per year tax if they are on properties over 2-acres. New commercial business owners will pay an equivalent tax based on the size of the property. A 10,000-square-foot commercial space would pay about $2,600 per year, city planning department officials estimate. The tax will increase by 2 percent each year.

As a lifelong resident of the island and new business owner, Estuary Beans & Barley brewery owner Scott Harrison said he is concerned about the potential burden the MID may place on new businesses. His brewery on Meek’s Farm Road is located on the same lot as the new Charleston Distilling, which relocated from King Street in November.

“It takes a long time to open up a business here and it takes a long time to get the approvals,” he said. “I am sure things at the city are backed up, but especially with COVID-19, time is important.”

Harrison opened his brewery in 2020, so he won’t be subject to the new tax, but he wants the city to encourage new development as long as it respects the island’s agricultural roots.

“We have a farm-to-table kind of feel out here that Johns Island has always been known for,” he said. “On the one hand, I would hate to see the farms go away, but it would be nice if city planning helped growth happen the way it does in the rest of Charleston.”

Charleston County’s Urban Growth Boundary limits dense development on much of the island outside of Charleston city limits, which has helped preserve farmland in the area.

Zlogar, the Johns Island task force chair, said he could see the MID benefiting efforts to balance urban development and rural preservation. With new funding sources, the city could buy land for park space or conservation areas to create a buffer between the urban growth boundary and the rest of the island where more development will take place.

“It’s all about community, how do you use these funds to bring the community together,” he said.

Along with the Johns Island Task Force, other community groups have endorsed the MID, including the Johns Island Council and the Johns Island Community Association.

Councilman Karl Brady Jr., who represents Charleston’s portion of Johns Island, said he pursued the MID designation because many proposed improvements on the island struggle to receive sufficient funding.

“Improvements are coming, but I’m sure it’s not as fast as some people would like,” Brady said. “This will give us the ability to do some homegrown improvements like the Johns Island Park expansion and road and infrastructure projects.”

Johns Island is the first area of the city to get a MID, mainly because it has the most potential for new development, Charleston Planning Director Robert Summerfield said.

“Johns Island has quite a bit of future development, unlike West Ashley or the peninsula where most of the development will be redevelopment,” he said.

The district will likely not create significant revenue for at least three years, Summerfield said. However, once revenue is generated, the city may be able issue bonds with it to jumpstart its use.

Transportation improvements in particular are crucial, said Michael Johnson, president of the Headquarters Island Property Owners Association on Johns Island. Johnson grew up on Johns Island and returned after stints in Houston and New Orleans.

“Charleston has become one of the most unsustainable places I’ve visited in a long time,” he said. “The traffic is horrendous.”

Not all proposed road projects are popular. An ongoing plan to extend Interstate 526 from West Ashley through James and Johns Island is seen by some as a threat to Johns Island’s Gullah-Geechee heritage. That plan is largely funded by the S.C. Department of Transportation and Charleston County and will not likely be impacted by the MID.

Residents of Johns Island are likely years away from seeing improvements funded with MID dollars, but the development will continue.

Editorial: Charleston should seize chance to protect low-lying Johns Island land

As Charleston got serious about its threats from flooding and sea level rise, it launched the Dutch Dialogues to develop a road map showing how it could and should adapt and prepare for the future. Chief among those steps was a smart new zoning policy to guide development away from low-lying land and toward properties far less likely to flood.This idea has been fleshed out further during work on Charleston’s new comprehensive plan, and we urge the city to begin revamping its zoning code soon to codify this new elevation-based ap...

As Charleston got serious about its threats from flooding and sea level rise, it launched the Dutch Dialogues to develop a road map showing how it could and should adapt and prepare for the future. Chief among those steps was a smart new zoning policy to guide development away from low-lying land and toward properties far less likely to flood.

This idea has been fleshed out further during work on Charleston’s new comprehensive plan, and we urge the city to begin revamping its zoning code soon to codify this new elevation-based approach. But even before that happens, a pending conservation deal on Johns Island would mark an important step toward the larger goal. Both the city and the county should approve it.

The deal involves about 100 acres recently purchased for the Charleston Executive Airport on Johns Island — where a 242-home development known as River Run had been proposed. The Charleston County Aviation Authority closed on the site this summer.

While the airport’s purchase ends the immediate threat of development, it does not guarantee there will be no development there in the long run. That’s why the Lowcountry Land Trust and the city of Charleston plan to seek $500,000 from the city’s share of Charleston County greenbelt funds to place a permanent easement on 94 acres of the site. City Council is expected to vote this month on making the application, and council members should give it the green light.

The S.C. Conservation Bank already has granted the Land Trust $500,000 toward the conservation easement purchase; the aviation authority would receive $1 million total, only 25% of the easement’s total value.

Dale Morris, the city’s new resiliency director, toured the River Run site while consulting on the city’s Dutch Dialogue process and its more recent Charleston City Plan Land and Water Analysis. He found its low elevation — much of the land is 6 feet above sea level or lower — made it an unwise place to build. Leaving it alone would allow the marsh along the Stono River to migrate gradually landward as sea levels rise.

Of course, airport officials were interested in the land to ensure the airport has an adequate buffer between any future expansion and neighboring development, and that’s a sensible, forward-thinking move. Regardless of what happens with the airport, this conservation deal would be an important piece of ensuring that no flood-prone development ever occurs there. The easement would allow some minimal future public access, such as a nature trail or kayak launch.

The Historic Charleston Foundation, which helped sponsor the Dutch Dialogues, feels strongly that the easement deal would be a win-win and is also urging City Council to allocate $500,000 of its greenbelt funds. Additionally, we would urge the Greenbelt Advisory Board and County Council to approve it as well.

It’s easy to say that future development should not occur in the city’s low-lying areas, but actually preventing it is much more difficult. Many property owners are invested in land that they want their families to profit from one day, and much of our current zoning gives them the right to expect just that.

It’s true that zoning can and should be changed, but the work of guiding development away from these places also must address these owners’ interests — not necessarily by giving them all the profit they once might have hoped for but certainly not expecting them to bear a disproportionate share of the whole cost to make our community more resilient.

Accomplishing all that will take negotiation and hard work, and this Johns Island easement deal marks a hopeful first step toward that.

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Charleston OKs first comprehensive plan in SC to base zoning rules off of flood risk

The city of Charleston has enacted a broad plan that discourages new development in flood-prone areas.City Council members voted unanimously Oct. 12 on final approval of the city’s new Comprehensive Plan. It is the first in South Carolina that not only limits new development in flood-prone areas but also encourages development in areas with higher elevation and less flood risk.Cities in South Carolina are required to adopt one every 10 years to use as a guide for decisions such as land purchases, development regulations a...

The city of Charleston has enacted a broad plan that discourages new development in flood-prone areas.

City Council members voted unanimously Oct. 12 on final approval of the city’s new Comprehensive Plan. It is the first in South Carolina that not only limits new development in flood-prone areas but also encourages development in areas with higher elevation and less flood risk.

Cities in South Carolina are required to adopt one every 10 years to use as a guide for decisions such as land purchases, development regulations and budget priorities. Although much of the plan is nonbinding, it does serve as a guide for the city to rewrite its land-use code.

“It’s fascinating to think we may be on the cutting edge of implementing this,” said Charleston Chief Resilience Officer Dale Morris.

Preliminary land-use maps included in the comprehensive plan serve as a guide for changes to the city’s zoning ordinance.

“Everything has in it this component of resiliency and a more comprehensive view of resiliency,” Planning Director Robert Summerfield said.

Zoning changes could help the city avoid costly home buyouts and expensive infrastructure improvements in the coming decades. The city already spent millions of dollars to buy flood-prone homes along Church Creek in West Ashley, and city officials don’t want to repeat those types of purchases.

“Let’s be proactive for these changes in climate that we see coming and stop putting the risk on the people who are just trying to find a place to live,” Morris said.

Neighborhoods have different suggested areas for dense development.

The plan also assesses Charleston’s affordable housing needs.

It found that the cost of living in the Charleston area is now more expensive than Atlanta; Charlotte and Asheville, N.C.; Virginia Beach and Richmond, Va.; and Jacksonville Fla., according to additional data presented in the city’s comprehensive plan. The only large metro area in the region that is more expensive is Washington, D.C

Over the past 20 years, public and nonprofit efforts have created or preserved an average of 94 affordable housing units per year, the plan states.

Summerfield said many Charleston residents could benefit from a greater variety of housing types.

“You’re not just looking at ultra low-income people potentially on public assistance. You’re looking at them up through the people who have good jobs but aren’t paid enough,” he said. “We’re talking firefighters, nurses and city employees.”

Based on population projections, the city will need about 16,000 new units at a range of affordable rates by 2030 to meet demand.

Also at the Oct. 12 meeting, council members approved the creation of a Municipal Improvement District for Johns Island.

The district, which will exist for 30 years, will require new developments to pay a new tax to the city for use on infrastructure projects in the area. It does not apply to existing developments.

Lowcountry Fungi grows at its indoor Johns Island farm

Plenty of people picked up new hobbies during the COVID-19 shutdown — some tried their hands at bread-baking, while others dusted off their golf clubs or started a home renovation project. Lowcountry Fungi co-owners Jonathan Cox and Benny Mosiman started an indoor mushroom farm.“Many years ago, I was part of the Charleston Permaculture Guild and loved making mushroom logs and just did it casually,” said Cox, who also owns local kombucha company One Love. “When COVID happened, production from One Love kind of sl...

Plenty of people picked up new hobbies during the COVID-19 shutdown — some tried their hands at bread-baking, while others dusted off their golf clubs or started a home renovation project. Lowcountry Fungi co-owners Jonathan Cox and Benny Mosiman started an indoor mushroom farm.

“Many years ago, I was part of the Charleston Permaculture Guild and loved making mushroom logs and just did it casually,” said Cox, who also owns local kombucha company One Love. “When COVID happened, production from One Love kind of slowed down. So mushrooms came up, and I saw that there wasn’t really a good gourmet mushroom farm in Charleston.”

An idea started to form, and Cox hit the road in summer 2020, learning the ins and outs of indoor mushroom farming from Myers Mushrooms owner Eric Myers in Wichita, Kansas. Cox and Mosiman then built their own 1,000-foot facility in the same Johns Island warehouse as One Love, where they grow five mushroom varieties: blue oysters, lion’s mane, king trumpet, pioppini and black pearls. According to Cox, growing indoors allows for more quality control.

“Indoor farming is a much more controlled environment, but it allows you to grow a variety of mushrooms as well as a much higher quality than outdoors,” he said. “We’re creating a perfect environment, so it’s a much more efficient system.”

But how exactly does the duo grow mushrooms? According to Cox, “It’s not a very simple process. Mushrooms start off as mycelium, which is kind of like the seed, and you grow that onto substrates — like woods or waste products. It consumes all the energy from that substrate.”

Made of oak sawdust and soybean hulls, Cox’s substrate is placed in a plastic bag where the mushrooms grow. After the bags are run through a steam sterilizer to kill competitive micro-organisms, they are inoculated with the mycelium. The bags are then sealed for 4-6 weeks, allowing the mycelium to colonize the substrate. Still with us?

Once the bags are fully colonized, Cox takes them into his 200-square-foot “Grow Room” — which mimics a forest with 95% humidity and a temperature in the high 50s — and cuts open the bags. Exposure to oxygen, cool temperatures and high humidity stimulates the mushroom growth. Once harvested and packaged, the mushrooms are ready to be sold to trendy downtown spots like 167 Raw, Babas on Cannon, Basic Kitchen and Daps Breakfast and Imbibe.

“People like our mushrooms because our grow room is top-notch,” Cox said. “Growing them in cold temperatures and harvesting them young are definitely reasons why chefs love our mushrooms over most [others’].”

Folks who keep it local when purchasing mushrooms from Lowcountry Fungi are positively contributing to the environment. Every three pounds of mushrooms produce six pounds of compost — Spade & Clover Gardens owner John Warren picks up this compost for use on his Johns Island farm.

“He breaks it up and tills it into his soil,” said Cox, adding that the compost helps with water retention and pest management. “It adds life to the soil.”

Another reason to keep it local is mushooms’ short shelf life, Cox said.

“The main reason to buy local is mushrooms don’t last through distribution really well, so the sooner you can consume after harvesting, the higher-quality they’re going to be,” he said. “The shelf life is going to be better when it’s coming 20 miles down the road as opposed to 100.”

Fungi fans can purchase Lowcountry Fungi’s mushrooms at the downtown, West Ashley and Sea Island farmers markets, along with Lowcountry Street Grocery and Veggie Bin on Spring Street. Moving forward, Cox plans to add medicinal mushrooms and “value-add” products like mushroom patties and mushroom-infused coffee.

“Value-added products are my main focus, as well as teaching workshops on how to grow your own mushrooms at home and gardening with mushroom compost.”

For more information, follow Lowcountry Fungi on Instagram, @lowcountryfungi.

This story was the first installment of “Keep it Local,” a City Paper series that will provide an in-depth look at South Carolina ingredients and the folks behind the scenes supplying restaurants and home cooks with local produce, meat, fish and more.

Lowcountry High School Football Coverage - Week 6

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) -9/30Bamberg-Ehrhardt 24, Beckham 7 - Beckham played their first varsity game after receiving permission from the SCHSL to fill their schedule with varsity games but came up short at home.Battery Creek 30, Academic Magnet 20 - The Raptors were led by William Hyatt who went 21-31 for 266 yards and 2 TD’s while also rushing for 50 yards and another score. Charlie Kuyper also added 14 catches for 144 yards and a score. Academic Magnet drops to 2-3 on the season.10...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) -

9/30

Bamberg-Ehrhardt 24, Beckham 7 - Beckham played their first varsity game after receiving permission from the SCHSL to fill their schedule with varsity games but came up short at home.

Battery Creek 30, Academic Magnet 20 - The Raptors were led by William Hyatt who went 21-31 for 266 yards and 2 TD’s while also rushing for 50 yards and another score. Charlie Kuyper also added 14 catches for 144 yards and a score. Academic Magnet drops to 2-3 on the season.

10/1

Summerville 29, Stratford 7 - The Green Wave improve to 3-1 on the season while the Knights drop to 1-3

Ft. Dorchester 38, Ashley Ridge 7 - The Patriots stay undefeated at 5-0 while the Swamp Foxes drop to 2-3

Goose Creek 53, Berkeley 14 - The Gators were led by Demetri Simmons who rushed for 249 yards and 4 TD’s to improve to 4-2. The Stags drop to 1-2.

Cane Bay 27, Wando 7 - Jayvion Johnson threw for 2 TD’s as the Cobras move to 5-1 with the win. The Warriors fall to 2-2.

West Ashley 69, Stall 21 - The Wildcats improve to 2-3 on the season led by Jahleel Porter who rushed for 146 yards and 4 TD’s on the night. Zaye’Quan Smith also rushed for 140 yards and a score. Stall drops to 0-3

May River 35, James Island 18

Bluffton 55, Colleton County 30 - The Cougars drop their season opener despite leading 24-6 at the half.

Oceanside Collegiate at Bishop England - The Landsharks go to 3-3 with the win while the Bishops fall to 0-5

Hanahan 63, North Charleston 0 - Josh Shaw scored 3 early TD’s to lead the Hawks to the win to move to 4-1. The Cougars fall to 2-2.

Philip Simmons 63, Burke 0 - The Iron Horses improve to 5-1 while the Bulldogs drop to 1-3

Woodland 27, Lake Marion 18 - The Wolverines move to 1-2 with the victory

Timberland 43, Ridgeland-Hardeeville 0 - The Wolves stay undefeated on the season at 5-0 with the win

Whale Branch 31, Cross 14 - The Trojans fall to 0-2 on the season

Baptist Hill 42, St. John’s 22 - The Bobcats improve to 2-2 while the Islanders drop to 0-6

Laurence Manning 22, Porter-Gaud 17 - The Cyclones were led by Marshall Pritchett who threw for 78 yards and rushed for 67 and a touchdown but the loss drops them to 4-3.

Hilton Head Christian 48, Pinewood Prep 14 - The Panthers fall to 3-3 with the loss

Colleton Prep 38, Bethesda Academy 0 - The War Hawks move to 2-4 with the victory

Calhoun Academy 27, Dorchester Academy 23

St. John’s Academy 44, Kings Academy 0 - The Cavaliers improve to 4-1 on the season

Copyright 2021 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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