Best Moving Company in Johns Island

Let's Talk!

Quick Quote

Too Big? Too Heavy? We've Got Strong Men to Help!

Moving Company Johns Island, SC

If you have ever moved to a new house, apartment, or office by yourself, you know how much of a pain it can be. The moving process can be filled with many different emotions. On the one hand, you're probably excited about the new adventure that lies ahead of you. On the other hand, you're probably dreading the heavy lifting, pulling, packing, organizing, and logistical aspects of moving.

At Strong Men Moving, our goal is to remove that dread so you can focus on the fun and productive times ahead. With a team of hardworking, experienced moving professionals on your side, moving to a new home or office is easy, like Sunday morning.

The best part? As local, trusted movers in Johns Island, you won't have to take a loan out from the bank to pay for our moving services. We believe in hard work, friendly attitudes, efficiency, and fair pricing.

Service Areas

 Local Movers Johns Island, SC
 Professional Movers Johns Island, SC

Convenience is King

Strong Men Moving is a full-service moving company in Johns Island. We run our trucks at 110%, meaning we go above and beyond what other movers in Johns Island are willing to do.

Are you moving from out of state? Is your new house hard to find? Don't have the time or patience to pack and wrap all of your belongings? Don't sweat it – we've got your back. There's no job that's too large or too small for our strong men to handle, and there's no place in the Lowcountry that we won't go for you.

When we say convenience is king, we mean it.  We're talking nights, weekends, and availability 24-hours a day from Monday through Saturday. Our goal is to make your move as stress-free and simple as possible. That way, you have time to focus on enjoying your new home or office, while we worry about hauling your double vanity into the back of our truck.

When you bring in the Strong Men, you can rest assured that you're getting a full-service, friendly experience from the minute we pull into your driveway to the minute we shake your hand goodbye. Unlike some moving companies in Johns Island, punctuality is not our poison. We strive to arrive on time to each job that we are hired to perform.

Here are some of the most popular moving services our customers use:

 Packers And Movers Johns Island, SC

Residential Moving

Along with divorce and the loss of a job, moving is listed as one of the most stressful experiences a person can go through in their lifetime. When you consider the packing, the lifting, the scheduling, and the general disruption that moving can have on your life, it's easy to understand why.

As the premier moving company in Johns Island, our goal is to carry your moving burden, so you can stay focused on your daily life. You can rest easy knowing our movers in Johns Island will always show up to your home with a positive attitude, friendly smile, and motivation to work. We treat your property like it was our own and take great care in handling all the items we move for you.

In addition, we prep our team of movers for many situations and provide thorough training on the fundamentals of moving, packing, risk management, and more.

If you own specialty items such as art, antiques, or other valuables, we will take every precaution necessary to ensure your possessions arrive to your new home safe and sound.

Whether you're moving to a new home down the street or are coming from another state, we have the experience, tools, and professional movers to do the job correctly. We even offer additional residential moving services that include packing, unpacking, overnight storage, and much more.

Call or text us today to discover the full range of our residential moving specialties.

 Moving Services Johns Island, SC

Labor-Only Moving

Do you already have reliable transportation but still need a team of professional movers to handle your heavy lifting? Strong Men Moving now offers labor-only moving services in Johns Island for both residential and commercial moving projects.

A few benefits of labor-only moving include:

  • Reduce damage - our professional movers in Johns Island will make sure your belongings are properly loaded into your truck, reducing the probability of damaged or broken items.
  • Maximize Space - With years of experience in the moving industry, we have a sixth sense for space-efficient packing and loading. Our strong men will make the most out of your truck's usable space, which can help reduce trip time and save money on gas.
  • Quicker Moves - A team of Strong Men Moving will almost always be able to load and unload your belongings faster than a group of your friends. It's nothing personal! With our team of professionals, you can spend less time filling up your truck and more time on getting to your new home or office.
  • Save Money - Using your friends to help you move almost certainly means you will have to compensate them one way or another. Why spend your money on cases of beer and pizza when you can use it for a safer, quicker move?
 Movers Johns Island, SC

Commercial Moving

Johns Island and the surrounding metropolitan area is a hot spot for business. Dozens of companies scout Johns Island each year as a new place to call home, where they can broaden their horizons and find new clients. What some businesses do not take into account is the logistics and headaches involved with moving to a new location.

Strong Men Moving has built a reputation as a leader in commercial moving services in Johns Island. We have the tools, team, and experience necessary to facilitate a smooth move for your business at a reasonable price.

In our experience as a commercial moving company in Johns Island, we have discovered that it can be complicated to move to a new business location. During this transition, we know that you need:

  • Your office furniture, equipment, and supplies packed and secured safely
  • Storage space
  • A detailed, efficient plan of action to ensure an organized move
  • Minimal disruptions to your day-to-day operations

To make sure we meet the requirements above, we will speak with you at length about your upcoming commercial business relocation. That way, we get a better understanding of the logistics involved. We will also provide you with a free quote, so you can plan your budget ahead of time.

At Strong Men Moving, some common commercial moving services include:

  • Pickup and delivery of your office equipment and supplies
  • Loading and unloading office items
  • Packing and unpacking your office supplies
  • Assembly of your office furniture
  • Provide all necessary moving equipment and packing materials

Whether you have to move a few office chairs down the street or need help transitioning to a new location, we are here to serve.

 Long Distance Moving Company Johns Island, SC

Refuse Removal and Disposal

Did you find a bunch of unwanted junk after moving to a new office? Do you have an old, stinky couch taking up room in your basement? Don't sweat it - we will remove the old junk from your home or office quicker than you can say, "trash it!"

With Strong Men Moving's refuse removal services, we can haul away all the heavy, unusable items that your trash service won't pick up.

A few common junk removal items that we can remove for you are:

  • Couches
  • Chairs
  • Bed frames
  • Futons
  • Dressers
  • Mattresses
 Long Distance Moving Services Johns Island, SC

Professional Packing

If you're like most average folks living in the U.S., you probably have hundreds of items lying around your house that need to be packed before you can move to a new home. Packing can be a massive source of frustration, especially for busy families and professionals who don't have the time or patience to pack.

Why risk a sprained back or a throbbing headache when Strong Men Moving can handle all the packing for you? With our professional packing services in Johns Island, you can sit back and sip some sweet tea while we pack your keepsakes, furniture, electronics, clothes, and more. If you have valuable items like family heirlooms or fragile china, we will take extra care to make sure those items stay safe and unbroken during your upcoming move.

Why hire a moving company in Johns Island like Strong Men Moving to help you pack? Here's why most of our clients want us to pack for them:

  • Packing is a tedious, time-consuming chore
  • Professional packing minimizes the risk of injury
  • Professional packing reduces the risk of damaged items
  • Professional packing lets you focus on the more important aspects of moving, like setting up HVAC or internet service

Don't have many items to pack this time around? Ask us about our high-quality packing supplies like boxes, tape, furniture pads, and covers. We're here to help in any way that we can!

Moving Company Johns Island, SC

Cleanout Services

If you have a large-scale cleanout project, we can help with that, too. Our home and commercial cleanout services are great if you need to dispose of a large number of items in a short period of time.

All you have to do is give us a call, and we'll come to your location to remove your unwanted items, taking care not to damage your home or office. Once we have removed your refuse, we'll dispose of it in an environmentally-friendly fashion to help protect the Lowcountry we love so much.

A few common cleanout services in Johns Island include:

  • Estate cleanouts
  • House cleanouts
  • Basement cleanouts
  • Garage cleanouts
  • Foreclosure cleanouts
  • Apartment cleanouts
  • Office cleanouts
  • Commercial space cleanouts
  • Storage space cleanouts

General Labor Services

Are you working on a project that requires a team of strong laborers? Sometimes, hiring your friends just doesn't cut it. When you need a team that arrives on time, works hard, and does so with a smile, Strong Men Moving has got the help you need! As trusted movers in Johns Island, we employ seasoned labor professionals that can assist you with your next indoor or outdoor project. Ready to get started? Call or text us today so that we can get a good understanding of your upcoming project, and how our team can save you time, effort, and money.

Get Help Now

About Strong Men Moving

Established in 2019, Strong Men Moving has quickly become a leading moving company in Johns Island, SC. We have built our reputation on reliability, performance, price, and a positive attitude. We truly feel privileged to serve the residents of South Carolina. Our goal is to provide quality customer service with speed and diligence to all clients. We treat all of our customers the same, whether they hire us for a multi-facility commercial move or just need help loading and unloading a moving truck.

 Local Movers Johns Island, SC

Strong Men Moving offers service in the following communities and beyond:

  • Bluffton
  • Charleston
  • Columbia
  • Daniel Island
  • Folly Beach
  • Greenville
  • Hanahan
  • Hilton Head Island
  • Isle of Palms
  • James Island
  • Johns Island
  • Kiawah Island
  • Ladson
  • Mount Pleasant
  • Myrtle Beach
  • Nexton
  • North Charleston
  • Seabrook Island
  • Sullivan's Island
  • Summerville
  • West Ashley

Do you have questions?

Need a quote on your upcoming residential or commercial move? We are here to help however
possible. You can reach us via phone at 843-830-6305 or by email at [email protected].

We hope to hear from you soon!

Latest News in Johns Island, SC

Charleston County told to expect revised cost estimates for $2.3B Mark Clark Extension

State Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall said the new $2.35 billion price tag for the Mark Clark Extension could change within months in a presentation to Charleston County Council.For now, some county officials are choking on the idea of having to come up with $1.9 billion as Charleston County’s share of the road plan. An earlier, outdated estimate put the county’s cost share at $305 million.“I don’t know whether to laugh or to cry,” Councilman Henry Darby said. “I would never, ever go...

State Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall said the new $2.35 billion price tag for the Mark Clark Extension could change within months in a presentation to Charleston County Council.

For now, some county officials are choking on the idea of having to come up with $1.9 billion as Charleston County’s share of the road plan. An earlier, outdated estimate put the county’s cost share at $305 million.

“I don’t know whether to laugh or to cry,” Councilman Henry Darby said. “I would never, ever go with this.”

The long-planned Mark Clark Extension would extend Interstate 526 from its terminus at U.S. Highway 17 in West Ashley across the Stono River to Johns Island, where it would be a 45-mph parkway. Then it would cross the Stono River again to James Island, to connect with the James Island Connector at Folly Road.

The parkway would cover a distance of less than 8 miles, but the project involves two new bridges, connecting roads, wetlands and property acquisition costs that all drive up the price.

Under a 2019 agreement the county signed, the state’s share of the project is capped at $420 million, so all of the cost increase would be borne by the county. The last cost estimate was calculated in 2014. The project is slated for completion in 2035.

“I look forward to renegotiating with the state and looking for a path forward,” Councilwoman Jenny Honeycutt said.

The new estimate was sent to the county on April 25, and Hall went over the details at the council’s Finance Committee meeting May 5.

Hall stressed that with a large and complex road project, costs are difficult to nail down. She said DOT has reached out to road and bridge contractors to review the new estimate and expects to update the potential cost in 90 to 120 days.

Mark Clark Extension Project Director Jay Mattox said the $2.35 billion estimate was the result of a detailed and lengthy review.

“We ran this simulation that simulated the project tens of thousands of times and basically came up with $2.3 billion in all the different scenarios as the likely (maximum) cost,” Mattox said.

He said DOT came up with a base cost of $1.6 billion — the county’s share in that scenario would be $1.18 billion — then factored in things such as likely litigation and inflation.

“Even if our responsibility is $1.5 billion, that’s out of our league,” Councilman Dickie Schweers said. “We can’t play in that game. The state should be running this whole project.”

Knowing that DOT will be coming back in months with a potentially different estimate relieved County Council of having to make a decision soon, but the county has been asked to commit within six months to moving forward with continuing work at a cost of $75 million.

“The need for the project is obvious,” said Hall, citing the area’s rapid population growth.

She said the county’s ongoing plans to spend more than $200 million on traffic improvements along Main Road on Johns Island, and at the U.S. Highway 17 intersection, will help but won’t be enough.

The road project has the support of Charleston business and real estate groups, the City of Charleston, and the county. It’s opposed by conservation and wildlife groups, and residents have been divided.

Councilman Brantley Moody, who supports the Mark Clark Extension, blamed the rising costs on delays caused by opponents of the project. According to Mattox’s presentation, delays have added $112 million to the cost estimate.

Hall said DOT has concluded that the project is so large that it should be done in two phases, starting with extending the road from West Ashley across Johns Island. That’s meant to ensure that the job’s not too big, in order to get competitive bids if the project reaches that point.

Council Chairman Teddie Pryor said that when DOT comes back with the refined cost estimates in several months “then council can dive into this and figure out what to do.”

South Carolina says cost to finish I-526 in Charleston triples to $2.3B

The project's supporters suggest prices may soon fall, reducing the cost of I-526.CHARLESTON, S.C. — South Carolina's road agency says the cost to build a long-debated completion of the Interstate 526 loop has tripled to more than $2.3 billion because of rising costs of land and construction.The state's share of the Mark C...

The project's supporters suggest prices may soon fall, reducing the cost of I-526.

CHARLESTON, S.C. — South Carolina's road agency says the cost to build a long-debated completion of the Interstate 526 loop has tripled to more than $2.3 billion because of rising costs of land and construction.

The state's share of the Mark Clark Extension is capped at $420 million in a 2019 agreement with the Charleston County, meaning the county would need to find nearly $2 billion to complete the project — six times more than it planned.

The highway would start at the west end of I-526 in West Ashley, cross on to Johns Island and run back off the island to James Island. It would end at the James Island Connector.

“This, to me, is a perfect opportunity for Charleston County Council to walk away from this project,” Jason Crowley of the Coastal Conservation League told The Post and Courier of Charleston.

The league has fought the new highway for years, saying it would benefit few people and harm many.

A large portion of the project would go through Charleston. Mayor John Tecklenburg said the I-526 extension is vital.

"Our West Ashley and island residents need and deserve the traffic relief and public safety improvements this project will bring,” Tecklenburg said in statement.

The I-526 extension is separate from another project to widen the mostly four-lane interstate that links Mount Pleasant to the state port, Interstate 26 and West Ashley. The freeway has been busy because of the Charleston area's growth.

State officials said it could cost around $7 billion to expand I-526 to eight lanes, untangle its intersection with I-26 and build or expand several bridges along the route.

For the I-526 extension, the South Carolina Department of Transportation is asking Charleston County to show it still wants to fund the project, estimating the county would need to pay about $75 million to get ready for bids.

“I don’t know if people are going to have an appetite for it,” said County Council Chair Teddie Pryor. “Where are we going to get the extra money from?”

The project's supporters suggest prices may soon fall, reducing the cost of I-526. Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce said, though, that further delays show costs inevitably rise.

“The current cost of the project heightens the important need of completing this effort now," the chamber said.

Johns Island conservation easement would protect flood-prone area from development

A 94-acre property on Johns Island that was once the site of a proposed 240-home community may be protected from all future development.Charleston City Council on April 12 approved allocating about $515,000 of its greenbelt funding toward a conservation easement for the property, known as the Oakville Tract.Greenbelt funding is set aside by Charleston County to various municipalities in the county for conservation projects. The Lowcountry Land Trust is drafting the agreement to protect the property and matching the city’s...

A 94-acre property on Johns Island that was once the site of a proposed 240-home community may be protected from all future development.

Charleston City Council on April 12 approved allocating about $515,000 of its greenbelt funding toward a conservation easement for the property, known as the Oakville Tract.

Greenbelt funding is set aside by Charleston County to various municipalities in the county for conservation projects. The Lowcountry Land Trust is drafting the agreement to protect the property and matching the city’s allocation using funds from a grant awarded through the state of South Carolina.

“You wouldn’t want to be developing this site, it’s very low, it’s subject to flooding and it can have an impact on the overall drainage basin,” Mayor John Tecklenburg said during a Charleston City Council Real Estate Committee meeting April 11.

The Charleston Aviation Authority bought two parcels of land in August, including the Oakville tract, to prevent homes from sprouting on the edge of the 1,333-acre Charleston Executive Airport next to the Stono River.

The purchases will allow the airport to widen and extend one of its runways and use the Oakville tract as an undeveloped “clear zone” or safety buffer for the runway. The most that the Aviation Authority could build on the Oakville tract under the proposed conservation easement would be a road connecting different areas of the airport to each other, said City Councilman Karl Brady who represents the area.

“I think its a huge win because the airport gets a buffer zone and we’re able to save that low-lying land,” Brady said.

The 94-acre Oakville tract is mostly located in the city of Charleston but is partially within the county. It is also located entirely within the urban growth boundary, an area where higher density of development is allowed on Johns Island. The low-lying piece of land is also on Burden Creek. Preserving it from development will allow runoff to continue downstream rather than be blocked by homes, roads and businesses.

“There would have been a lot of repercussion upstream,” said Johns Island Taskforce Chairman John Zlogar of the previous proposal to build homes on the property. The task force was established in 2013 to bring together residents and local officials to address Johns Island-specific issues.

The Charleston Aviation Authority bought the Oakville tract and another 43-acre tract for $7.7 million. Out of that, $4.9 million went to the developers of the proposed community on the Oakville tract for the estimated development rights of the land. If the use of the city of Charleston’s allocation of greenbelt funds is given final approval by Charleston County, the Aviation Authority has agreed to donate $3.9 million worth of those development rights, said Natalie Olson, Sea Islands Program Director for the Lowcountry Land Trust.

The grant funds would reimburse the Aviation Authority for about $1 million worth of those land rights. The agency will retain ownership of the property, but the conservation easement will limit all development on it in perpetuity.

City Councilman Ross Appel told members of the Real Estate Committee that it is common for airports to create “buffer zones” along the edges of their properties.

“These airports are economic engines and there is going to be a lot of desire to develop in and around this area,” Appel said.

Charleston County Council’s Finance Committee will vote April 21 whether to approve the city’s allocation of its share of greenbelt funds to the conservation easement. The proposal will then need a final vote from County Council.

The Oakville property is one of several tracts of land on Johns Island that are being considered for greenbelt funds. County Council’s Finance Committee will also consider approving greenbelt funds to place conservation easements on two large properties, a 700-acre tract along the Stono River known as Ravenswood and a 35-acre tract that once included the Sea Islands Farmers Cooperative. The co-op was founded by Black farmers in the 1970s.

Editorial: Find better traffic solutions for West Ashley than I-526 extension

Skeptics of extending Interstate 526 from U.S. Highway 17 to Johns and James islands have called the project “a code, not a road,” a pithy rhyme that describes the project’s impracticality while recognizing the serious traffic problems — and the very real frustrations over those problems — that supporters have hoped the new road would magically solve.But with its price tag rising from $725 million several years ago to $2.35 billion today, and with Charleston County required to pay all but $380 million of ...

Skeptics of extending Interstate 526 from U.S. Highway 17 to Johns and James islands have called the project “a code, not a road,” a pithy rhyme that describes the project’s impracticality while recognizing the serious traffic problems — and the very real frustrations over those problems — that supporters have hoped the new road would magically solve.

But with its price tag rising from $725 million several years ago to $2.35 billion today, and with Charleston County required to pay all but $380 million of that — the state capped its commitment at $420 million and already has spent more than $45 million toward that cap — the project’s status has gone from impractical to practically ridiculous. Or, as Councilman Henry Darby said Thursday, “I don’t know whether to laugh or cry.”

Instead of getting kicked by the mule yet again, it’s time for Charleston County and state transportation officials to back away from the special status of this project, also known as the Mark Clark extension (even though it would be a 45 mph parkway, not an interstate), and instead redouble their efforts on other traffic solutions that can be completed more quickly, less expensively and with more widespread public favor.

This road is going nowhere fast, but that reality must not make officials too complacent to tackle the serious congestion problems that made extension advocates think it was a good idea in the first place. Even if a magical solution were to appear, the extension still would take more than a dozen years to build. S.C. Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall has recommended proceeding with about $150 million in engineering work to get the project ready for bid, but we urge her and Charleston County not to spend another cent.

Instead, they should use that money to launch a special planning effort to identify better options for easing congestion in West Ashley as well as on Johns and James islands. That would move us toward a solution faster than somehow hoping there will be a way forward for the Mark Clark extension when the state Transportation Department returns to the county in a few months with an even more refined cost estimate. Some council members suggest opponents have delayed 526 and driven up its costs. Even if that were true, and we would argue it’s not, they should think about this: Now that it costs more than $1 billion more, are those opponents going to give up now?

There are other solutions that aren’t as dramatic but also wouldn’t be nearly as costly or controversial, such as building the “pitchfork” roads on both sides of Maybank Highway from River Road to the Stono River bridge. The ongoing work to address Main Road, from Bees Ferry to Betsy Kerrison, also will help, and there are other projects in West Ashley that could help, too. We also believe our tax dollars would be better spent beginning a study on a bus rapid transit line through West Ashley similar to the one being developed along Rivers Avenue. In other words, we should seek many solutions, not a single, prohibitively expensive one.

Extending Interstate 526 across Johns and James islands in particular was never a good idea because of the environmental damage involved and the dubious impact it would have on traffic congestion, particularly when measured by the bang for the buck. More cost-effective solutions can address traffic without marring the edges of these two sea islands.

Look at it another way: From a traffic engineering standpoint, it might be easier to get around the Charleston region if Interstate 526 were extended from where it ends at U.S. Highway 17 in Mount Pleasant through the Old Village and across the Cooper River to where the James Island connector touches down on the peninsula. It would be like building our own ring road, like Interstate 285 around Atlanta.

Of course, nobody has suggested that — for a multitude of reasons that go far beyond cost.

For years, development on Johns Island has been allowed to spread rapidly while road improvements lagged far behind, a scenario that has played out in other parts of the Charleston metro area. Anyone who lives on Johns Island or travels there knows it’s a frustrating problem that also impacts West Ashley and James Island. But that’s another reason why state and local officials should step back from their grand 526 extension plan and refocus their thinking on more cost-effective, practical traffic solutions.

Get a weekly recap of South Carolina opinion and analysis from The Post and Courier in your inbox on Monday evenings.

Work on freestanding James Island ER to begin this week

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — A new medical facility is coming to James Island. Prep work on Trident Health’s new freestanding ER is expected to kick off this week.Trident Health officials say in just a year’s time from now, the James Island facility will give more immediate access to emergency care residents in the area.While rain delayed the official groundbreaking Monday, it will not slow down the work that will begin onsite. Trident Health officials say site prep is expected to begin in the coming days and m...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — A new medical facility is coming to James Island. Prep work on Trident Health’s new freestanding ER is expected to kick off this week.

Trident Health officials say in just a year’s time from now, the James Island facility will give more immediate access to emergency care residents in the area.

While rain delayed the official groundbreaking Monday, it will not slow down the work that will begin onsite. Trident Health officials say site prep is expected to begin in the coming days and materials will soon be brought to the new location at 945 Folly Road, located right across from the Palmetto Goodwill.

The $12.5 million facility will have 11 in-patient beds to start out, with the ability to grow to fit even more beds. It will be equipped with advanced imaging and diagnostic labs, as well as stroke and behavioral health telemedicine services.

Trident’s President and CEO Christina Oh says it was her connection to similar underserved communities which pushed her to expand Trident’s resources to the James Island area.

“It's really exciting to see that now we have an opportunity to bring emergency services and all the associated care that comes with that to a community that's needed it for a very long time. I’m from southern West Virginia, so I have a special passion, especially with my family coming from a public health background, I have a special passion for bringing health care, especially emergency care to communities that traditionally have not been exposed to it,” Oh said.

This will be Trident’s fourth freestanding Emergency Room facility, adding to locations in Monck’s Corner, Brighton Park and North Charleston, whose facilities served over 150,000 patients in 2021 alone.

A free-standing ER facility allows for the same emergency medical care given at larger medical center, like Trident Medical Center’s headquarters in North Charleston. However, the services would be within a smaller facility right in a community’s backyard.

Doctors say that not having to drive the extra 30 to 40 minutes to a medical center or ER facility can be the difference between life and death.

Facilities like the James Island ER can help stabilize patients in need of immediate care in situations such as strokes, heart attacks and other high trauma injuries until they can get to a larger medical center for further treatment.

The ER can also alleviate pressure on emergency departments at larger facilities when they are at capacity.

Trident Medical Center’s facilities helped over 350,000 people annually over the course of the pandemic and doctors say it was the challenges faced during those times which made expanding their resources a primary concern.

“I think COVID brought to light how important it was to have everybody to make sure that everybody has access to health care and to high quality health care,” Emergency Medical Physician with Trident Health, Ibrahim Isa said. “So when you improve your outreach and improve how easy it is for people to seek emergency medical care, you can actually improve outcomes and how healthy people are in some of these communities.”

The freestanding ER on James Island will be open for use 24/7 and is expected to be up and running by April of 2023.

The original groundbreaking ceremony was set for today at 10 a.m. Monday, but due to weather conditions, it will be pushed back two weeks to Monday, May 2 at the same time.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.