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Moving Company Sullivan's Island, SC

If you have ever moved to a new house, apartment, or office by yourself, you know how much of a pain it can be. The moving process can be filled with many different emotions. On the one hand, you're probably excited about the new adventure that lies ahead of you. On the other hand, you're probably dreading the heavy lifting, pulling, packing, organizing, and logistical aspects of moving.

At Strong Men Moving, our goal is to remove that dread so you can focus on the fun and productive times ahead. With a team of hardworking, experienced moving professionals on your side, moving to a new home or office is easy, like Sunday morning.

The best part? As local, trusted movers in Sullivan's Island, you won't have to take a loan out from the bank to pay for our moving services. We believe in hard work, friendly attitudes, efficiency, and fair pricing.

Service Areas

 Local Movers Sullivan's Island, SC
 Professional Movers Sullivan's Island, SC

Convenience is King

Strong Men Moving is a full-service moving company in Sullivan's Island. We run our trucks at 110%, meaning we go above and beyond what other movers in Sullivan's Island are willing to do.

Are you moving from out of state? Is your new house hard to find? Don't have the time or patience to pack and wrap all of your belongings? Don't sweat it - we've got your back. There's no job that's too large or too small for our strong men to handle, and there's no place in the Lowcountry that we won't go for you.

When we say convenience is king, we mean it.  We're talking nights, weekends, and availability 24-hours a day from Monday through Saturday. Our goal is to make your move as stress-free and simple as possible. That way, you have time to focus on enjoying your new home or office, while we worry about hauling your double vanity into the back of our truck.

When you bring in the Strong Men, you can rest assured that you're getting a full-service, friendly experience from the minute we pull into your driveway to the minute we shake your hand goodbye. Unlike some moving companies in Sullivan's Island, punctuality is not our poison. We strive to arrive on time to each job that we are hired to perform.

Here are some of the most popular moving services our customers use:

 Packers And Movers Sullivan's Island, SC

Residential Moving

Along with divorce and the loss of a job, moving is listed as one of the most stressful experiences a person can go through in their lifetime. When you consider the packing, the lifting, the scheduling, and the general disruption that moving can have on your life, it's easy to understand why.

As the premier moving company in Sullivan's Island, our goal is to carry your moving burden, so you can stay focused on your daily life. You can rest easy knowing our movers in Sullivan's Island will always show up to your home with a positive attitude, friendly smile, and motivation to work. We treat your property like it was our own and take great care in handling all the items we move for you.

In addition, we prep our team of movers for many situations and provide thorough training on the fundamentals of moving, packing, risk management, and more.

If you own specialty items such as art, antiques, or other valuables, we will take every precaution necessary to ensure your possessions arrive to your new home safe and sound.

Whether you're moving to a new home down the street or are coming from another state, we have the experience, tools, and professional movers to do the job correctly. We even offer additional residential moving services that include packing, unpacking, overnight storage, and much more.

Call or text us today to discover the full range of our residential moving specialties.

 Moving Services Sullivan's Island, SC

Labor-Only Moving

Do you already have reliable transportation but still need a team of professional movers to handle your heavy lifting? Strong Men Moving now offers labor-only moving services in Sullivan's Island for both residential and commercial moving projects.

A few benefits of labor-only moving include:

  • Reduce damage - our professional movers in Sullivan's Island will make sure your belongings are properly loaded into your truck, reducing the probability of damaged or broken items.
  • Maximize Space - With years of experience in the moving industry, we have a sixth sense for space-efficient packing and loading. Our strong men will make the most out of your truck's usable space, which can help reduce trip time and save money on gas.
  • Quicker Moves - A team of Strong Men Moving will almost always be able to load and unload your belongings faster than a group of your friends. It's nothing personal! With our team of professionals, you can spend less time filling up your truck and more time on getting to your new home or office.
  • Save Money - Using your friends to help you move almost certainly means you will have to compensate them one way or another. Why spend your money on cases of beer and pizza when you can use it for a safer, quicker move?
 Movers Sullivan's Island, SC

Commercial Moving

Sullivan's Island and the surrounding metropolitan area is a hot spot for business. Dozens of companies scout Sullivan's Island each year as a new place to call home, where they can broaden their horizons and find new clients. What some businesses do not take into account is the logistics and headaches involved with moving to a new location.

Strong Men Moving has built a reputation as a leader in commercial moving services in Sullivan's Island. We have the tools, team, and experience necessary to facilitate a smooth move for your business at a reasonable price.

In our experience as a commercial moving company in Sullivan's Island, we have discovered that it can be complicated to move to a new business location. During this transition, we know that you need:

  • Your office furniture, equipment, and supplies packed and secured safely
  • Storage space
  • A detailed, efficient plan of action to ensure an organized move
  • Minimal disruptions to your day-to-day operations

To make sure we meet the requirements above, we will speak with you at length about your upcoming commercial business relocation. That way, we get a better understanding of the logistics involved. We will also provide you with a free quote, so you can plan your budget ahead of time.

At Strong Men Moving, some common commercial moving services include:

  • Pickup and delivery of your office equipment and supplies
  • Loading and unloading office items
  • Packing and unpacking your office supplies
  • Assembly of your office furniture
  • Provide all necessary moving equipment and packing materials

Whether you have to move a few office chairs down the street or need help transitioning to a new location, we are here to serve.

 Long Distance Moving Company Sullivan's Island, SC

Refuse Removal and Disposal

Did you find a bunch of unwanted junk after moving to a new office? Do you have an old, stinky couch taking up room in your basement? Don't sweat it - we will remove the old junk from your home or office quicker than you can say, "trash it!"

With Strong Men Moving's refuse removal services, we can haul away all the heavy, unusable items that your trash service won't pick up.

A few common junk removal items that we can remove for you are:

  • Couches
  • Chairs
  • Bed frames
  • Futons
  • Dressers
  • Mattresses
 Long Distance Moving Services Sullivan's Island, SC

Professional Packing

If you're like most average folks living in the U.S., you probably have hundreds of items lying around your house that need to be packed before you can move to a new home. Packing can be a massive source of frustration, especially for busy families and professionals who don't have the time or patience to pack.

Why risk a sprained back or a throbbing headache when Strong Men Moving can handle all the packing for you? With our professional packing services in Sullivan's Island, you can sit back and sip some sweet tea while we pack your keepsakes, furniture, electronics, clothes, and more. If you have valuable items like family heirlooms or fragile china, we will take extra care to make sure those items stay safe and unbroken during your upcoming move.

Why hire a moving company in Sullivan's Island like Strong Men Moving to help you pack? Here's why most of our clients want us to pack for them:

  • Packing is a tedious, time-consuming chore
  • Professional packing minimizes the risk of injury
  • Professional packing reduces the risk of damaged items
  • Professional packing lets you focus on the more important aspects of moving, like setting up HVAC or internet service

Don't have many items to pack this time around? Ask us about our high-quality packing supplies like boxes, tape, furniture pads, and covers. We're here to help in any way that we can!

Moving Company Sullivan's Island, SC

Cleanout Services

If you have a large-scale cleanout project, we can help with that, too. Our home and commercial cleanout services are great if you need to dispose of a large number of items in a short period of time.

All you have to do is give us a call, and we'll come to your location to remove your unwanted items, taking care not to damage your home or office. Once we have removed your refuse, we'll dispose of it in an environmentally-friendly fashion to help protect the Lowcountry we love so much.

A few common cleanout services in Sullivan's Island include:

  • Estate cleanouts
  • House cleanouts
  • Basement cleanouts
  • Garage cleanouts
  • Foreclosure cleanouts
  • Apartment cleanouts
  • Office cleanouts
  • Commercial space cleanouts
  • Storage space cleanouts

General Labor Services

Are you working on a project that requires a team of strong laborers? Sometimes, hiring your friends just doesn't cut it. When you need a team that arrives on time, works hard, and does so with a smile, Strong Men Moving has got the help you need! As trusted movers in Sullivan's Island, we employ seasoned labor professionals that can assist you with your next indoor or outdoor project. Ready to get started? Call or text us today so that we can get a good understanding of your upcoming project, and how our team can save you time, effort, and money.

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About Strong Men Moving

Established in 2019, Strong Men Moving has quickly become a leading moving company in Sullivan's Island, SC. We have built our reputation on reliability, performance, price, and a positive attitude. We truly feel privileged to serve the residents of South Carolina. Our goal is to provide quality customer service with speed and diligence to all clients. We treat all of our customers the same, whether they hire us for a multi-facility commercial move or just need help loading and unloading a moving truck.

 Local Movers Sullivan's Island, SC

Strong Men Moving offers service in the following communities and beyond:

  • Bluffton
  • Charleston
  • Columbia
  • Daniel Island
  • Folly Beach
  • Greenville
  • Hanahan
  • Hilton Head Island
  • Isle of Palms
  • James Island
  • Johns Island
  • Kiawah Island
  • Ladson
  • Mount Pleasant
  • Myrtle Beach
  • Nexton
  • North Charleston
  • Seabrook Island
  • Sullivan's Island
  • Summerville
  • West Ashley

Do you have questions?

Need a quote on your upcoming residential or commercial move? We are here to help however
possible. You can reach us via phone at 843-830-6305 or by email at [email protected].

We hope to hear from you soon!

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

The Co-Op Frosé and Eatery coming to Huntsville, first in Alabama

In 2016, Jess Patterson tried a drink that would change his future. At Bar Primi, an Italian joint on New York’s Lower East Side, he had his first frosé, a frozen wine drink.“It’s one of the few frozen drinks that is light and refreshing,” Patterson says now. “There’s not much sugar in it. A frozen daiquiri or a pina colada or margarita, those are all a little bit too sugary for me. And so we just sort of fell in love (with frosé), because of how light and refreshing it was.”...

In 2016, Jess Patterson tried a drink that would change his future. At Bar Primi, an Italian joint on New York’s Lower East Side, he had his first frosé, a frozen wine drink.

“It’s one of the few frozen drinks that is light and refreshing,” Patterson says now. “There’s not much sugar in it. A frozen daiquiri or a pina colada or margarita, those are all a little bit too sugary for me. And so we just sort of fell in love (with frosé), because of how light and refreshing it was.”

A former Wall Street trader, Patterson now lived in the Charleston, S.C. area, where in 2012 he started a small local chain of bodega-style delis called The Co-Op. Those businesses are all located right on the beach. Patterson thought adding frosé to their offerings - especially to-go, so customers take a cup to the beach with them - had possibilities.

Now, frosé, made in frozen daquiri machines, makes up around 30 percent of sales of The Co-Op’s first five locations, including the original in Sullivan’s Island. The business’ sixth location will open this week in Nashville.

In spring 2023, Patterson will open The Co-Op Frosé and Eatery’s seventh location, in Huntsville. It will be their first in Alabama. The shop will go into a space at The Village of Providence, the development located off University Drive at Providence Main Street. That area is already home to eateries like Phuket Thai Restaurant, Mellow Mushroom pizza, Taco Mama and local celebrity chef James Boyce’s Grille on Main.

The Co-Op’s most popular frosé flavors include strawberry, blackberry lavender, pear and mango. “I think we have between 40 and 50 different flavors,” Patterson, an Evansville, Indiana native, says. “In Huntsville we’ll probably have six machines and 12 flavors rotating per day.”

Their signature frosé size goes for around $11 and contains the equivalent of three or so glasses of wine, Patterson says. The Co-Op also does flights of frosé.

Most of the business’ sales comes from its gourmet sandwiches, including a California Turkey (with avocado, sprouts, bacon and tomato), and breakfast items, including a bacon, egg and cheese sandwich and an avocado toast. Breakfast items run between $4 and $8. Lunch items, $8 to $12. More info at thecoopsi.com. Patterson says The Co-Op’s hours in Huntsville will be something like 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Since Village of Providence is one of Huntsville’s city-sanctioned “entertainment districts,” Co-Op customers will be able to take their cups and perambulate around the development, which also contains retail and other businesses as well as hotels and homes. Patterson says, “We’re really trying to grow that happy-hour-and-on business.”

MORE ON FOOD:

How did SC get the Palmetto State nickname? It wasn’t just because there are lots of palmettos

Ever wonder how South Carolina came to be nicknamed the Palmetto State?While, yes, the state does have many palmetto trees scattered around the entirety of the state due to its large species population within the borders of South Carolina, this tree also has a historical significance to the state.The nickname is derived from South Carolina’s state tree, the sabal palmetto.Also called the cabbage palmetto, s...

Ever wonder how South Carolina came to be nicknamed the Palmetto State?

While, yes, the state does have many palmetto trees scattered around the entirety of the state due to its large species population within the borders of South Carolina, this tree also has a historical significance to the state.

The nickname is derived from South Carolina’s state tree, the sabal palmetto.

Also called the cabbage palmetto, sabal palm, inodes palmetto and the Carolina palmetto, the sabal palmetto was designated as the official state tree by Joint Resolution Number 63 all the way back on March 17, 1939.

This palmetto tree was symbolic toward the defeat of the British fleet at Fort Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island during the Battle of Sullivan’s Island. This was due to the fact that the fort was built from palmetto logs, which absorbed the impact of the cannon balls and would not shatter.

Hence, South Carolina earned its nickname: the Palmetto State.

The Battle of Sullivan’s Island was the first decisive American victory over the British Royal Navy during the Revolutionary War and took place on June 28, 1776.

“The ferocity of the British naval bombardment had no great effect on the fort. Sabal palmetto trunks embedded in deep sand proved pliable and sturdy enough, absorbing iron balls like a sponge,” wrote the National Park Service of the battle.

At the time, Charleston residents were unaware if the fort had been victorious against the British or if it had been captured following the Battle of Sullivan’s Island.

The fort’s commander, Colonel William Moultrie, had then sent a boat to inform the residents of the good news. Loud cheers were said to reverberate through the streets.

“The defense had been a major victory for the Americans in Charleston. General Lee wrote, ‘The behavior of the Garrison, both men and officers, with Colonel Moultrie at their head, I confess astonished me.’ Six days later the Declaration of Independence was signed in Philadelphia. Afterwards, the South Carolina General Assembly renamed the fort, Fort Moultrie, in honor of the commander of Fort Sullivan,” wrote the American Battlefield Trust.

As for the palmetto trees themselves, sabal palms are native to the southeastern parts of the country.

“The cabbage palmetto is found in the coastal plain region from North Carolina to Florida. The palm inhabits maritime forests, “islands” within salt and brackish marshes, and the edges of ponds. It is also a commonly planted tree in urban areas throughout South Carolina,” states the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

The palmetto tree can grow to a height of 33 feet tall and its leaves can grow to about 3 feet across. They are formed with a spongier, scattered tissue and more malleable cells than most other trees, which allow them to bend with the wind during major storms such as hurricanes and tropical storms.

In addition to their many other attributes, these trees flower during the month of July and can be quite fragrant, attracting many types of pollinators.

As for size, according to Plant Real Florida, the University of Florida conducted several age and growth rates of sabal palms, the preliminary results indicated that, under average conditions in the wild, these plants can require 10 to 15 years of growth or more from seed to the first sign of a trunk at ground level. After this initial growth spurt, the trunks will grow about 6 inches per year. Meaning, a standing sabal palm with 20 feet of trunk is at least 50 years old.

The palmetto tree can be seen as a figure of significance in nearly every aspect of the state’s inception. It has been adopted as the state’s nickname, is included in the state seal, is on the state flag, is in the Pledge to the Flag of South Carolina, and can be seen in everyday life while carrying on day-to-day activities within the state.

This story was originally published September 14, 2022 5:00 AM.

Labor Day crowds return to normal for beach businesses

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) — From the shops to the sand, leaders across the Lowcountry’s beaches said this is the first Labor Day weekend “back to normal” since before the pandemic.Sullivan’s Island mayor Patrick O’Neil said although the threat of rain resulted in a slightly quieter weekend than anticipated, local leaders are happy to see the Labor Day crowds return.“We continue, everyday, just to see exponential growth of the foot traffic that’s coming through,” s...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) — From the shops to the sand, leaders across the Lowcountry’s beaches said this is the first Labor Day weekend “back to normal” since before the pandemic.

Sullivan’s Island mayor Patrick O’Neil said although the threat of rain resulted in a slightly quieter weekend than anticipated, local leaders are happy to see the Labor Day crowds return.

“We continue, everyday, just to see exponential growth of the foot traffic that’s coming through,” said Kathleen Arnold, fine art consultant at Sandpiper Gallery on Sullivan’s Island. “The traffic is constant, back and forth. People walking to the restaurants, people heading to the beach.”

Arnold said in her experience, the tourism season on Sullivan’s Island typically lasts from May until Labor Day weekend every year. However, after seeing tourist travel ebb and flow “practically year-round” in recent years, she expects the season to last through October or November.

“People want to escape the hustle and bustle of life, so they come here,” Arnold said, attributing the steady growth of tourism to Charleston’s “small-town charm.”

Leaders at Folly Beach agree. Mayor Tim Goodwin said stores there are struggling to keep up with an increase of both foot traffic — and car traffic — from tourists and locals this summer.

“Sunday was a pile of people out here,” Goodwin said. “The first time this year we’ve seen traffic backed up as far as it was.”

Goodwin encouraged anyone heading to the water to use the free Beach Reach app. Created by the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments, the app provides live traffic cameras, maps and beach policies for three of Charleston’s most popular beaches.

The mayor said the biggest challenges facing store owners at Folly Beach are a lack of workers and employee burnout. As a result, some stores are struggling to keep their normal hours.

Click here to learn more about the town of Sullivan’s Island.

Annual litter cleanup seeks volunteers

The 33rd annual Beach Sweep and River Sweep litter cleanup is scheduled for Sept. 17 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., and volunteers are needed at nearly 100 locations in South Carolina.In East Cooper, sites include the Isle of Palms, Sullivan’s Island, Daniel Island shoreline, Ben Sawyer Boulevard causeway and Shem Creek.Each year thousands of people volunteer for the sweep, South Carolina’s largest one-day litter cleanup of beaches, marshes and waterways. Last year, despite COVID-19, 2,255 volunteers cleared over 20,000 po...

The 33rd annual Beach Sweep and River Sweep litter cleanup is scheduled for Sept. 17 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., and volunteers are needed at nearly 100 locations in South Carolina.

In East Cooper, sites include the Isle of Palms, Sullivan’s Island, Daniel Island shoreline, Ben Sawyer Boulevard causeway and Shem Creek.

Each year thousands of people volunteer for the sweep, South Carolina’s largest one-day litter cleanup of beaches, marshes and waterways. Last year, despite COVID-19, 2,255 volunteers cleared over 20,000 pounds of debris, covering 161 miles statewide. Groups spread out on foot or in boats from the various cleanup sites, and they typically return with bags packed with plastic and glass bottles, cans, food containers, clothing, toys and cigarette butts. Larger items have included household appliances, vehicle tires and building materials. As much of the debris as possible is recycled.

The S.C. Sea Grant Consortium partners with the S.C. Department of Natural Resources to organize the statewide event, which is held in conjunction with the Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup. Anyone can participate—individuals, families, schools, youth groups, civic and conservation clubs and businesses. Volunteers can sign up to assist at the cleanup sites listed on the websites below.

Sponsors for the statewide event are Curtiss-Wright, Gaitor Bait Adventure Tours, INEOS Aromatics, Magnolia Plantation Foundation, Nature Adventures, Ocean Conservancy, Safe Harbor Charleston City and Walmart Market #34.

To participate in coastal counties, visit https://www.scseagrant.org/bsrs-sites/ or contact Susan Ferris Hill at (843) 953-2092 or [email protected]. To participate in inland counties, visit https://sweep-scdnr.hub.arcgis.com/pages/volunteer or contact Bill Marshall at (803) 734-9096 or [email protected].

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Photo essay: SC sea turtle advocates see their work pay off as nest counts go up

The endangered loggerhead sea turtle has allies on the sand. Despite historic trends of the species’ decline, the tides have been changing.The sea turtles take nearly 30 years before females can reproduce, making conservation efforts a long-term game. Conservationists have started to see a return on investme...

The endangered loggerhead sea turtle has allies on the sand. Despite historic trends of the species’ decline, the tides have been changing.

The sea turtles take nearly 30 years before females can reproduce, making conservation efforts a long-term game. Conservationists have started to see a return on investment after years of their efforts. They have seen increasing success rates of hatchings starting in the early 2000s, and spiked in 2014. According to seaturtle.org, this year’s nest count has already surpassed 2021’s nest count by over 2,000 nests.

This species, which is millions of years old, has been unable to adapt fast enough to rapidly changing environmental conditions and man-made dangers. Erosion on many of South Carolina’s coastal islands has vastly changed the landscape of many of loggerhead turtles’ most popular nesting grounds.

Jerry Tupacz, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife refuge specialist at Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, has worked on these islands for over 17 years. He has yet to see the generation of turtles that he began working with in 2005 come back to nest.

“I’d like to think I’ll be doing this for another 10 years, but we’ll see,” Tupacz said. “In my mind, I’ll be coming back as a volunteer to see them.”

Tupacz claims that changing tides have greatly reduced areas of beach area viable for nesting on all the islands under his watch. “You don’t need big events to make this stuff happen. I watch almost 20-35 feet of beach lost every year,” he said.

Humans also pose a great danger to these turtles. Fishing lines and boat propellers make up the largest two human-made threats at Cape Romain, but light pollution on more populated beaches interferes with turtles making their way to the water.

“Humans are responsible for the devastation in the first place. If the humans won’t help them, the species will cease to exist,” said Michael Barnett, a frequent volunteer at Cape Romain and an avid conservation photographer with a large Instagram following.

During the six month nesting season, turtle specialists and volunteer patrols work tirelessly on beaches all along the coast of South Carolina. In recent years, volunteering in sea turtle conservation has become very popular.

Mary Pringle, the Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island Turtle Patrol project manager, said the group has 170, or “way too many”, volunteers, in addition to a lengthy waitlist. More remote and turtle-dense nesting areas often get less attention, volunteers and funding than groups that cover more accessible and people-heavy nesting beaches. This leaves staff at places like Cape Romain often overworked, but they still press on through the labor-intensive work.

“One of these days I won’t be so tired after I get off and I’ll go fishing,” Tupacz said.

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