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Moving Company West Ashley, SC

If you have ever moved to a new house, apartment, or office by yourself, you know how much of a pain it can be. The moving process can be filled with many different emotions. On the one hand, you're probably excited about the new adventure that lies ahead of you. On the other hand, you're probably dreading the heavy lifting, pulling, packing, organizing, and logistical aspects of moving.

At Strong Men Moving, our goal is to remove that dread so you can focus on the fun and productive times ahead. With a team of hardworking, experienced moving professionals on your side, moving to a new home or office is easy, like Sunday morning.

The best part? As local, trusted movers in West Ashley, you won't have to take a loan out from the bank to pay for our moving services. We believe in hard work, friendly attitudes, efficiency, and fair pricing.

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 Local Movers West Ashley, SC
 Professional Movers West Ashley, SC

Convenience is King

Strong Men Moving is a full-service moving company in West Ashley. We run our trucks at 110%, meaning we go above and beyond what other movers in West Ashley are willing to do.

Are you moving from out of state? Is your new house hard to find? Don't have the time or patience to pack and wrap all of your belongings? Don't sweat it – we've got your back. There's no job that's too large or too small for our strong men to handle, and there's no place in the Lowcountry that we won't go for you.

When we say convenience is king, we mean it.  We're talking nights, weekends, and availability 24-hours a day from Monday through Saturday. Our goal is to make your move as stress-free and simple as possible. That way, you have time to focus on enjoying your new home or office, while we worry about hauling your double vanity into the back of our truck.

When you bring in the Strong Men, you can rest assured that you're getting a full-service, friendly experience from the minute we pull into your driveway to the minute we shake your hand goodbye. Unlike some moving companies in West Ashley, punctuality is not our poison. We strive to arrive on time to each job that we are hired to perform.

Here are some of the most popular moving services our customers use:

 Packers And Movers West Ashley, SC

Residential Moving

Along with divorce and the loss of a job, moving is listed as one of the most stressful experiences a person can go through in their lifetime. When you consider the packing, the lifting, the scheduling, and the general disruption that moving can have on your life, it's easy to understand why.

As the premier moving company in West Ashley, our goal is to carry your moving burden, so you can stay focused on your daily life. You can rest easy knowing our movers in West Ashley will always show up to your home with a positive attitude, friendly smile, and motivation to work. We treat your property like it was our own and take great care in handling all the items we move for you.

In addition, we prep our team of movers for many situations and provide thorough training on the fundamentals of moving, packing, risk management, and more.

If you own specialty items such as art, antiques, or other valuables, we will take every precaution necessary to ensure your possessions arrive to your new home safe and sound.

Whether you're moving to a new home down the street or are coming from another state, we have the experience, tools, and professional movers to do the job correctly. We even offer additional residential moving services that include packing, unpacking, overnight storage, and much more.

Call or text us today to discover the full range of our residential moving specialties.

 Moving Services West Ashley, SC

Labor-Only Moving

Do you already have reliable transportation but still need a team of professional movers to handle your heavy lifting? Strong Men Moving now offers labor-only moving services in West Ashley for both residential and commercial moving projects.

A few benefits of labor-only moving include:

  • Reduce damage - our professional movers in West Ashley will make sure your belongings are properly loaded into your truck, reducing the probability of damaged or broken items.
  • Maximize Space - With years of experience in the moving industry, we have a sixth sense for space-efficient packing and loading. Our strong men will make the most out of your truck's usable space, which can help reduce trip time and save money on gas.
  • Quicker Moves - A team of Strong Men Moving will almost always be able to load and unload your belongings faster than a group of your friends. It's nothing personal! With our team of professionals, you can spend less time filling up your truck and more time on getting to your new home or office.
  • Save Money - Using your friends to help you move almost certainly means you will have to compensate them one way or another. Why spend your money on cases of beer and pizza when you can use it for a safer, quicker move?
 Movers West Ashley, SC

Commercial Moving

West Ashley and the surrounding metropolitan area is a hot spot for business. Dozens of companies scout West Ashley each year as a new place to call home, where they can broaden their horizons and find new clients. What some businesses do not take into account is the logistics and headaches involved with moving to a new location.

Strong Men Moving has built a reputation as a leader in commercial moving services in West Ashley. We have the tools, team, and experience necessary to facilitate a smooth move for your business at a reasonable price.

In our experience as a commercial moving company in West Ashley, we have discovered that it can be complicated to move to a new business location. During this transition, we know that you need:

  • Your office furniture, equipment, and supplies packed and secured safely
  • Storage space
  • A detailed, efficient plan of action to ensure an organized move
  • Minimal disruptions to your day-to-day operations

To make sure we meet the requirements above, we will speak with you at length about your upcoming commercial business relocation. That way, we get a better understanding of the logistics involved. We will also provide you with a free quote, so you can plan your budget ahead of time.

At Strong Men Moving, some common commercial moving services include:

  • Pickup and delivery of your office equipment and supplies
  • Loading and unloading office items
  • Packing and unpacking your office supplies
  • Assembly of your office furniture
  • Provide all necessary moving equipment and packing materials

Whether you have to move a few office chairs down the street or need help transitioning to a new location, we are here to serve.

 Long Distance Moving Company West Ashley, SC

Refuse Removal and Disposal

Did you find a bunch of unwanted junk after moving to a new office? Do you have an old, stinky couch taking up room in your basement? Don't sweat it - we will remove the old junk from your home or office quicker than you can say, "trash it!"

With Strong Men Moving's refuse removal services, we can haul away all the heavy, unusable items that your trash service won't pick up.

A few common junk removal items that we can remove for you are:

  • Couches
  • Chairs
  • Bed frames
  • Futons
  • Dressers
  • Mattresses
 Long Distance Moving Services West Ashley, SC

Professional Packing

If you're like most average folks living in the U.S., you probably have hundreds of items lying around your house that need to be packed before you can move to a new home. Packing can be a massive source of frustration, especially for busy families and professionals who don't have the time or patience to pack.

Why risk a sprained back or a throbbing headache when Strong Men Moving can handle all the packing for you? With our professional packing services in West Ashley, you can sit back and sip some sweet tea while we pack your keepsakes, furniture, electronics, clothes, and more. If you have valuable items like family heirlooms or fragile china, we will take extra care to make sure those items stay safe and unbroken during your upcoming move.

Why hire a moving company in West Ashley like Strong Men Moving to help you pack? Here's why most of our clients want us to pack for them:

  • Packing is a tedious, time-consuming chore
  • Professional packing minimizes the risk of injury
  • Professional packing reduces the risk of damaged items
  • Professional packing lets you focus on the more important aspects of moving, like setting up HVAC or internet service

Don't have many items to pack this time around? Ask us about our high-quality packing supplies like boxes, tape, furniture pads, and covers. We're here to help in any way that we can!

Moving Company West Ashley, SC

Cleanout Services

If you have a large-scale cleanout project, we can help with that, too. Our home and commercial cleanout services are great if you need to dispose of a large number of items in a short period of time.

All you have to do is give us a call, and we'll come to your location to remove your unwanted items, taking care not to damage your home or office. Once we have removed your refuse, we'll dispose of it in an environmentally-friendly fashion to help protect the Lowcountry we love so much.

A few common cleanout services in West Ashley include:

  • Estate cleanouts
  • House cleanouts
  • Basement cleanouts
  • Garage cleanouts
  • Foreclosure cleanouts
  • Apartment cleanouts
  • Office cleanouts
  • Commercial space cleanouts
  • Storage space cleanouts

General Labor Services

Are you working on a project that requires a team of strong laborers? Sometimes, hiring your friends just doesn't cut it. When you need a team that arrives on time, works hard, and does so with a smile, Strong Men Moving has got the help you need! As trusted movers in West Ashley, we employ seasoned labor professionals that can assist you with your next indoor or outdoor project. Ready to get started? Call or text us today so that we can get a good understanding of your upcoming project, and how our team can save you time, effort, and money.

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About Strong Men Moving

Established in 2019, Strong Men Moving has quickly become a leading moving company in West Ashley, SC. We have built our reputation on reliability, performance, price, and a positive attitude. We truly feel privileged to serve the residents of South Carolina. Our goal is to provide quality customer service with speed and diligence to all clients. We treat all of our customers the same, whether they hire us for a multi-facility commercial move or just need help loading and unloading a moving truck.

 Local Movers West Ashley, SC

Strong Men Moving offers service in the following communities and beyond:

  • Bluffton
  • Charleston
  • Columbia
  • Daniel Island
  • Folly Beach
  • Greenville
  • Hanahan
  • Hilton Head Island
  • Isle of Palms
  • James Island
  • Johns Island
  • Kiawah Island
  • Ladson
  • Mount Pleasant
  • Myrtle Beach
  • Nexton
  • North Charleston
  • Seabrook Island
  • Sullivan's Island
  • Summerville
  • West Ashley

Do you have questions?

Need a quote on your upcoming residential or commercial move? We are here to help however
possible. You can reach us via phone at 843-830-6305 or by email at [email protected].

We hope to hear from you soon!

Latest News in West Ashley, SC

Widening debate runs through West Ashley

With the Charleston population growing more than 18% since 2010, Glenn McConnell Parkway now has more volume than the roadway is able to handle. The situation will only get worse through 2040, according to an assessment by Charleston County.In the next two years, the county will be addressing the issue by widening the four-lane road to six lanes, adding seven bus stops, improving turn lanes and landscaping, adding a new stoplight, and building a shared pedestrian and bike path.The improvements will span 2.1 miles from Bees Ferr...

With the Charleston population growing more than 18% since 2010, Glenn McConnell Parkway now has more volume than the roadway is able to handle. The situation will only get worse through 2040, according to an assessment by Charleston County.

In the next two years, the county will be addressing the issue by widening the four-lane road to six lanes, adding seven bus stops, improving turn lanes and landscaping, adding a new stoplight, and building a shared pedestrian and bike path.

The improvements will span 2.1 miles from Bees Ferry Road through Magwood Drive — the busy corner between Home Depot and Chick-fil-A. Charleston County officials said the construction will take two years, with an expected completion of March 2024.

Herbert Nimz, project manager with Charleston County, and David Wertz, construction engineering and inspection project manager for Charleston County’s project consultant, Infrastructure Consulting & Engineering, led a March 21 public hearing at the Bees Ferry West Ashley Library to update the public about the Glenn McConnell Widening Project. Council members, including District 2 Councilman Kevin Shealy, District 6 Councilman Kylon Middleton and District 7 Councilman Brantley Moody, also attended the meeting.

As a line of community members snaked through the library waiting to sign in and fill nearly every seat before the meeting began, several attendees voiced their frustrations. The biggest concern seemed to be over noise that a six-lane road might cause.

Before Nimz was halfway through his presentation, the group was already firing off questions and expressing concerns about noise, flooding mitigation in communities, lack of sidewalks for the proposed bus paths and how the new Spinx gas station at the corner of Wildcat Boulevard and Glenn McConnell Parkway will impact traffic into West Ashley High School.

Officials first identified that Glenn McConnell Parkway was problematic in the 2016 half-cent sales tax referendum. Two years later, the first public meeting was held, asking for input on future plans. In January 2020, officials held a second meeting at West Ashley High School and two months later published a final report.

The Glenn McConnell Widening Project received project permits in 2021, and a construction contract was awarded earlier this year.

Chris Ebel, a home appraiser and West Ashley resident, worries officials are not widening the parkway to alleviate traffic, but to add even more cars to the road.

Since the 2020 meeting, Lennar’s Grand Bees has developed three phases of new residential homes on Bees Ferry Road, a Harris Teeter has opened down the street, and a new apartment complex is almost ready to open.

“Everybody’s doing the same thing. Let’s just get more cars, build 300 more apartments, and now we’re going to need eight lanes,” she said. “By then, this highway’s going to be in everybody’s living room.”

Nimz said many of the thousands of new homes built in the last two years should have been accounted for in the design process when the projects were under development.

“We have to do our best to assume growth ... especially because we live in an area that people want to live in, and that number’s pretty high,” Nimz said.

He added that while he doesn’t live in West Ashley and can’t speak for those who do, “there’s a limit to what you can do as far as preventing future development. That’s not what this (meeting) is about.”

A concern repeated throughout the meeting was the sound disruption caused by the current four-lane road and what that would evolve into with the addition of two more lanes and seven bus stops.

Several attendees, including Ebel, said that they can hear cars zipping down Glen McConnell Parkways as late as 11 p.m.

In addition to suggesting a lower enforced speed limit — the limit will be reduced during construction, then returned to 55 mph after completion — residents at the meeting requested a sound barrier.

A sound study was performed in 2019, Nimz said, but results did not determine the necessity for a wall. According to the Glenn McConnell Parkway Highway Traffic Noise Technical Memorandum published in April 2020, only one of the four communities studied met the requirements for a sound barrier; however, aerial power lines permanently prevent a structure from being erected along that portion of the corridor.

Other community members requested another study to be done, one individual asking if her homeowners’ associations could perform another study out of pocket. Nimz and Wertz said industry standards were followed to collect the data.

To accommodate expansion, construction will push outward to create a third westbound lane, while eastbound, construction will push inside toward the grass median.

Throughout the 2.1-mile plan, four bus stops with pullover lanes will be added westbound, with three added eastbound. Each bus stop will include a shelter, bench, trash receptacle and bicycle rack.

On the east side of the parkway, a multi-use path between 8 and 12 feet wide will run from Bees Ferry Road to Glenn McConnell Parkway. At its closest point, the path will be a few feet off the main road. At its furthest, the path will have a 10-foot buffer between traffic with Jersey barriers in some areas. In others, the path will be separated from the main road by existing ditches.

The westbound side will have short walkways from the bus stops back into the nearest community, but officials were stumped when asked if further sidewalks would be added westbound to connect stops to other communities or if crosswalks would be added to allow bus travelers to cross Glenn McConnell Parkway and connect to transportation.

Nimz said planners did their best to make connections to existing facilities. For the bus stop at Goodwill Way, he said, “You may have to travel that backroad and then walk up to Mary Ader.”

Down the road at the corner of Glenn McConnell Parkway and William E. Murray Boulevard, a four-building, 341-unit apartment complex has been proposed adjacent to West Ashley High School. A new Spinx gas station is already under construction at the corner of Wildcat Boulevard and the parkway.

Nimz said the Spinx will have right-in, right-out entrances and exits, meaning traffic leaving on the Wildcat Boulevard side would only have the option to turn right, pull a U-turn or circle around the school, and then come back out to Glenn McConnell Parkway.

West Ashley resident Craig Peterkin worried how that will affect traffic, especially during school drop-off and pickup, and during rush hour.

“When those plans were originally made, was consideration given for the new 300-unit complex and the gas station going in on that corner?” Peterkin said.

Nimz said the Spinx plans would have been accounted for as he doesn’t believe the S.C. Department of Transportation would bring in a development that would negatively affect the designs and “throw off the whole project.”

“In coordination with the DOT, they would have gotten with us in plan-development,” Nimz said. “This project has been in design since 2018, so we’ve had ongoing conversations with the DOT. Anything that comes after that, they would have to work with DOT to get approval for access.”

Eight intersections will be improved in the next two years, including the intersection of Bees Ferry Road and Glenn McConnell Parkway. Plans there call for signal modifications, an additional left turn lane, sidewalk connection and improvements, new shared-use path, enhanced landscaping.

Bees Ferry Road will not incur any enhancements beyond the intersection once traffic flows onto the road. Nimz also clarified there will not be improvements to the right turn lane onto Glenn McConnell Parkway.

The parkway will be completely paved by the end of the project.

Phase 1 of 3 on the construction timeline includes shoulder work from Bees Ferry Road to Magwood Drive, prep work for the installation of an additional westbound travel lane and minor drainage modifications.

Any work requiring lane closures will be done at night during off-peak hours.

“We plan to give quarterly updates about status of the project to be shared with HOA presidents in the area and dispersed to residents, accordingly,” he said.

Reach Teri Errico Griffis at 843-849-3144.

Roper St. Francis fined $104K for mishandling medical waste, which was sent to Charleston Co. landfills

Roper St. Francis Healthcare was fined $104,000 by the state for repeatedly mishandling medical waste sent to Charleston County landfills, according to ordersRoper entered into two consent orders with the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control where it agreed to pay a total fine of $104,000 for multiple violations of the state’s infectious waste laws.The hospital noted in the orders that it did not agree with the department’s version of events.The incidents involved two of the health system&rsquo...

Roper St. Francis Healthcare was fined $104,000 by the state for repeatedly mishandling medical waste sent to Charleston County landfills, according to orders

Roper entered into two consent orders with the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control where it agreed to pay a total fine of $104,000 for multiple violations of the state’s infectious waste laws.

The hospital noted in the orders that it did not agree with the department’s version of events.

The incidents involved two of the health system’s hospitals, Roper Hospital in Charleston and Bon Secours St. Francis Hospital in West Ashley, spokesman Andy Lyons said.

According to the order, DHEC was contacted Aug. 27 by a manager of Carolina Waste and Recycling in North Charleston that it had received a load that appeared to contain medical waste, which it is not licensed to handle.

A department inspector found bags that were open and spilling onto the ground that appeared to contain bloody gauze, gloves, medical vials and papers from Roper. The bags were not marked as a biohazard and secured as required.

Roper sent a contractor to pick up and properly dispose of it.

Two weeks later, Carolina Waste again contacted DHEC to report it had received what appeared to be more medical waste. The medical waste was unmarked and some bags were open. Other waste was kept in containers too flimsy to prevent tearing.

Along with gauze and other waste products were gloves and tubing and surgical drapes. Roper again arranged for proper pickup and disposal.

About a month later on Oct. 5, DHEC got a call from a manager at the Charleston County landfill about a load from Roper that appeared to contain infectious waste, which it is not permitted to take. Further inspection showed bags and containers that were open or easily torn, with some not marked as biohazards.

They contained bloody syringes, gauze, medical vials, and intubation equipment along with documents from Roper.

St. Francis was fined for incidents in September and October involving medical waste, including a patient’s wristband with the hospital’s name, mixed in with other trash sent to Charleston landfills.

In November, DHEC issued Roper and St. Francis notices of violations of the state’s infectious waste disposal laws. Roper responded with a waste management plan and corrective actions that cost the hospital $114,000, according to the order. St. Francis also took corrective actions.

The health system “went above and beyond to fix it,” Lyons said. “Since the state’s last visit more than six months ago, we’ve gone to great lengths and expense to make improvements to our handling of infectious waste.”

The hospitals did immediately investigate and worked with DHEC to correct each of the violations, the state agency noted.

DHEC ordered the health system to pay civil penalties of $50,000 for Roper Hospital in Charleston and $54,000 for Bon Secours St. Francis Hospital in West Ashley, and those have been paid, Lyons said.

Last year, Medical University of South Carolina also ran afoul of DHEC after some of its medical waste was found in the Charleston County landfill.

MUSC said at the time it was working with DHEC to correct it and reviewing its waste-management practices. That investigation is still ongoing, a DHEC spokeswoman said.

Editor’s note: this article has been updated to correct the total amount Roper St. Francis Healthcare was fined by the state.

This May, Charleston art appears in unexpected places. Make yours one of them.

If you’ve got it, flaunt it.It’s not only the flora and fauna that make May so spectacular in Charleston. For decades, the merry month has enjoyed an artful amp-up of visual splendors made by human hands, too.Since the 1970s, when Spoleto Festival USA and Piccolo Spoleto forever changed the look and feel of a Charleston May, it is the time of year when we prepare to celebrate the city as an international arts hub.A seasonal groundswell has long been part of the city’s rhythm, and we’ve grown accus...

If you’ve got it, flaunt it.

It’s not only the flora and fauna that make May so spectacular in Charleston. For decades, the merry month has enjoyed an artful amp-up of visual splendors made by human hands, too.

Since the 1970s, when Spoleto Festival USA and Piccolo Spoleto forever changed the look and feel of a Charleston May, it is the time of year when we prepare to celebrate the city as an international arts hub.

A seasonal groundswell has long been part of the city’s rhythm, and we’ve grown accustomed to this cultural cash crop heading toward the Memorial Day opening of the festivals.

Lately, I’ve spotted a particular surge in the visual arts, one that extends beyond the white walls of galleries to enliven public places and commercial spaces.

Artful parks, streets and lobbies

On April 15, Joe Riley Waterfront Park recently welcomed “Lilly,” the winsome bronze statue of a young girl blithely reaching upwards. It is the work of artist Mary Whyte, who donated the sculpture to the city.

“We thought of a place where, number one, it would be seen, and that’s here at Joe Riley Waterfront Park,” Mayor John Tecklenburg said at the opening ceremony, noting its fitting position near the fountain where children play.

On the West Ashley Greenway, artist Hirona Matsuda recently installed new work in a trio of clean white art boxes punctuating the verdant pathway, part of an ongoing art activation in the public space.

There will soon be another work of public art in the Cannonborough-Elliotborough neighborhood in downtown Charleston. The Coastal Community Foundation has made possible a work at the new Shiloh Park off Smith Street between Morris and Cannon streets, an undulating landscape of Palmetto trees, water features and flowing walkways.

Columbia-based artist Cedric Umoja has been elbows-deep in cobalt blue paint, the dominant color of a multimedia installation, which will integrate found materials and interplay with bordering plants.

In search of a locale for such an installation, the artist landed on Charleston. “Where do I think it could be done where people would actually appreciate it, the space would be appreciated?,” he mulled, and determined this city’s residents would take care of both the work and the park in which it was to be installed.

Art Charleston, a new initiative launched by the Gibbes Museum of Art, will launched May 9-13, with the aim of transforming a week in May into an annual visual arts celebration.

Angela Mack, executive director of the Gibbes, recently told The Post and Courier, “We have always been thinking about creating a week in Charleston that’s devoted to the visual arts, something that really encompasses the community,” something akin to arts immersions like Art Basel.

Along with events, including marquee happenings that spill onto the street like the May 12 Gibbes on the Street event, an eventual goal is to radiate through Charleston.

This year, The Charleston Place has unrolled a coinciding program that will take place throughout the month of May and feature four artists-in-residence: New York-based, multimedia illustrator Meredith Wing; Charleston-based artist Sam Sidney; Charleston photographer Leigh Webber; and New Orleans-based watercolor artist and jewelry designer Annie Moran.

They will each spend time on-site, in a lobby-based glass “arthouse,” and will engage in art sales, special events and workshops.

There are other modes of artistic expression, too. On May 15, the art is set to flow through Charleston streets in the form of street performance with Indonesian artist Arahmaiani’s Flags Project, a community-based, ecologically driven work performed previously in European and Asian countries. The artist’s Charleston residency represents a new initiative of the Foundation for Spirituality and the Arts.

Starting at the College of Charleston’s Alumni Center at 86 Wentworth St. around 1:30 p.m., it traverses landmarks, monuments and houses of worship to culminate with brief interfaith choral performance at Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim at 90 Hasell St.

On May 20, Gap Gallery mounts its third show at its new pop-up spot at Hed Hi Studio on 654 King St. Titled “Ladies Gap Show,” the all-woman lineup curated by Marie Carladous takes place from 5 to 8 p.m.

Those who want to join in the creative process can visit Marion Square from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 30-31, when South Carolina School for the Deaf and the Blind Foundation invites the public to lend a hand, quite literally, to the making of its community-sourced, handprint-rich “I Love You” sculpture.

A call to artful action

Sometimes, a momentary embrace of visual art begets art that endures. Take, for instance, the evocative Shepard Fairey murals on Calhoun and King streets, which made their debut in May 2014 for the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art’s “The Insistent Image: Recurrent Motifs in the Art.”

Another recent work can be found at Gap Gallery’s previous location at 638 King St., which restaurateur Ben D’Allesandro had invited Carladous to use as a gallery. While Gap was there, artist Jonathan Rypkema was in search of a blank wall for a short-term project. D’Allesandro was game to offer one up. Pleased with the artist’s result, he now plans to keep it there.

Carladous has no time to bask in such dynamic triumphs. On the heels of her May 20 Gap show, she will shift her focus to Piccolo Spoleto to serve as the juror of the exhibition of local artists at City Gallery.

A place shaped by hope

When “Lilly” was unveiled at Waterfront Park, Tecklenburg observed, “Mary did an incredible job just capturing the spirit of joy and opportunity and hope for the future,” also underscoring that the work is “a great example of what we can do in the city of Charleston for more public art.”

Yes, local artists face formidable obstacles — nosebleed-high rents, scarce studio space and fiercely competitive resources, not to mention our screen-addled world’s tenuous hold on its most crucial connective thread, the arts.

And, to be belabor my May flower metaphor, nascent moments of vitality can easily die on the vine. Sustained growth requires steady oxygen and light.

During the pandemic, Charlestonians time and again demonstrated their creativity in eye-popping, uplifting displays. Halloween skeletons artfully scaled historic Charleston homes. Lavish holiday garlands next-leveled gateways and porticos. Extravagant chalk tableaux flourished afoot.

Imagine what magic we could collectively conjure in a communal visual wink each May by similarly art-ing up our facades and curbsides, our store vitrines and piazzas.

By check or by chalk, by talk or by walk, there is no time like the present month of May to ensure that Charleston remains true to its claim as a cultural haven, truly, madly and artfully.

Charleston retailer buys adjacent shop for $3.25M; new eatery coming to West Ashley

A downtown Charleston women’s apparel retailer recently bought an adjacent building that once housed another clothing shop and now has a satellite operation on the upper peninsula as part of its expanded footprint.An affiliate of Hampden Clothing, owned by Stacy Smallwood, purchased the former Anne’s women’s clothing shop at 312 King St. for $3.25 million in November, according to Charleston County land records.It serves as an extension to Hampden’s flag...

A downtown Charleston women’s apparel retailer recently bought an adjacent building that once housed another clothing shop and now has a satellite operation on the upper peninsula as part of its expanded footprint.

An affiliate of Hampden Clothing, owned by Stacy Smallwood, purchased the former Anne’s women’s clothing shop at 312 King St. for $3.25 million in November, according to Charleston County land records.

It serves as an extension to Hampden’s flagship store at 314 King and its counterpart shoe store James next door.

The apparel store has been growing its presence on the peninsula in recent years. It now occupies more than 10,000 square feet of retail space on middle King, including Small by Hampden at 324 King.

The retailer also recently leased the former Barrie Newman Building at 747 Meeting St., according to the commercial real estate firm NAI Charleston.

The retailer will use the 7,200-square-foot rental space as an e-commerce and distribution office to focus on the company’s growing online business. Special events, such as partnerships with brands, also are planned at the site for shoppers.

The newly leased property in the area called NoMo, for North Morrison, backs up to the planned Lowcountry Lowline linear park that will run along the peninsula’s spine. The site also is close to Interstate 26 and offers on-site, off-street parking.

“The iconic building is a perfect fit for the internationally recognized boutique,” said Sarah Shelley, of NAI Charleston, who represented Hampden Clothing LLC as the tenant.

Jack Owens, also of NAI Charleston, represented the building owner, AD Meeting LLC, which paid $2.25 million for the property in December 2020, according to land records.

What’s cooking?

A new dessert-type eatery is in the works for West Ashley.

Big Dough Daddy LLC recently leased 1,581 square feet at 3863 West Ashley Circle, off Bees Ferry Road, according to the commercial real estate firms Avison Young and Bridge Corporate Solutions.

The venture will be called Cookie Dough Bliss & Creamery and will offer cookies, cookie dough, ice cream and other treats, according to owner Jason Keyser of West Ashley.

An opening is tentatively planned for April or May. His partner, Kitty McDowell, will be the general manager. She previously worked at the creamery’s location in North Carolina.

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The Concord, N.C.-based company has 11 locations in eight states. The West Ashley site will be its first in South Carolina.

On the way

A five-building commercial complex is the newest proposal for a developing area in Cainhoy.

The planned Foundation Place at Point Hope on Clements Ferry Road north of the Publix-anchored Point Hope Commons Shopping Center will include 38,000 square feet of retail, restaurant and office space on about 4.5 acres.

Plans call for 22,000 square feet of office, retail and fast-casual restaurant space, including a coffee shop with a drive-thru, as well as a 16,000-square-foot, two-story medical office building, according to site plans.

Three buildings are slated to be 6,000 square feet each while another with the drive-thru window will be 4,000 square feet.

The developer is listed as Vulcan Property Group of Fort Mill, which is building the new 25,000-square-foot Serendipity Labs co-working structure in Nexton in Summerville. The co-working space is expected to open during the summer.

Stretching out

The Charleston franchise owner of a new Chicago-based fitness firm is planning four more locations across the Lowcountry after launching his first operation earlier this month in southern Mount Pleasant.

Franchisee John Youngblood said he plans to open Spenga fitness sites in northern Mount Pleasant, James Island, the Summerville area and West Ashley. Specific locations and opening schedules have not been determined.

Youngblood opened the initial Spenga site in a 4,000-square-foot space at 996 Johnnie Dodds Blvd. in the Publix-anchored Queensborough Shopping Center in Mount Pleasant on Jan. 8. A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held Jan. 18.

Spenga combines spin, strength training and yoga.

Rooftops and retail reshape West Ashley

Development in West Ashley around Bees Ferry Road has been dominated by multifamily growth — a trend the city of Charleston planning director said the city wasn’t expecting when development of annexed areas began in the late 1990s.“Years ago, the assumption was that there was going to be a huge amount of retail demand,” said Christopher Morgan, planning director for Charleston. “There are a couple of new multifamily developments right near ...

Development in West Ashley around Bees Ferry Road has been dominated by multifamily growth — a trend the city of Charleston planning director said the city wasn’t expecting when development of annexed areas began in the late 1990s.

“Years ago, the assumption was that there was going to be a huge amount of retail demand,” said Christopher Morgan, planning director for Charleston. “There are a couple of new multifamily developments right near West Ashley High School on the Glen McConnell Parkway that are on properties that are zoned general business.”

Morgan said that general business in the city allows for 26 units per acre for residential, and the market has responded. Developers who might have invested time and money into office buildings 20 years ago are often choosing multifamily construction.

Early major multifamily developments included Grand Oaks Plantation, built in the late 1990s that added more than 1,400 homes with an entrance from Bees Ferry Road; Hunt Club, built in the early 2000s with approximately 500 homes also off Bees Ferry Road and Carolina Bay, an 1,800-home multifamily development five minutes from Bees Ferry Road.

Smaller multifamily developments currently in the works, according to Morgan, include 38 single-family lots at Verbena Lane and Apiary Lane at the end of U.S. Highway 17 and Bees Ferry Road. Developers recently announced 55 single-family homes off of U.S. 17 on Hughes Lane near the 17 and Bees Ferry Road intersection.

Multifamily development is occurring on both sides of U.S. Highway 17 in the area. Palisades of Charleston apartments, with several hundred units, is nearing completion near the intersection of Main Road and U.S. 17.

Support retail has followed the rooftops and includes a number of grocery stores, including Publix, Harris Teeter and Lowe’s Food stores.

With demand from multifamily developments comes with the need for improved road infrastructure. Major road widening projects are in the works to keep up with the number of cars on U.S. 17, Main Road and Bees Ferry Road thoroughfares.

In 2016, road improvement projects were identified by Charleston County to be paid for with the transportation half-cent sales tax. Considered “a project of regional significance,” per county documents, the $195 million road improvements could include a flyover at U.S. Highway 17 at Main Road and widening Main Road from Bees Ferry Road to Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

The first improvement will be for U.S. 17 and Main Road intersection improvements and Main Road improvements from Bees Ferry Road to River Road. Right of way plans for the first segment were expected to be complete at the end of 2020.

Bob Nuttall, managing principal and founder of Lee & Associates Charleston, said road improvement projects move at a considerably slower pace than private development. Nuttall, who specializes in office, retail, industrial, land and investment products, said a better solution to keep road congestion down would be to build denser multifamily developments with neighborhood retail.

“Any private development could go from zero to done in under 24 months, but any government project is going to be three times that long, if not longer,” Nuttall said. “The office, the retail, the warehouse, the multifamily — all that’s being built faster than any roads can ever keep up with, but I think that higher density is one way to help solve that problem.”

Nuttall said there’s no stopping the influx of people moving to the Lowcountry, but higher-density multifamily development, where units are built taller above a ground-floor level of retail and commercial spaces or neighborhood commercial spaces where residents can walk to without getting in their cars is a way to curb road congestion.

“There’s only two directions that you can grow in an area like Charleston — up or out. So, you either have to do the higher density stuff, like what’s happening on Morrison Drive, which I think is the right move, or build out wider,” Nuttall said. “The Glen McConnell Parkway expansion opened the opportunity for easy ingress and egress. And now it’s this kind of gangbusters. People are talking about how Bees Ferry Road already has so much traffic on it at peak times.”

Nuttall said is encouraged by the Medical University of South Carolina moving a clinic into the Citadel Mall in West Ashley and Roper St. Francis opening an Express Care in the area. He said that keeps needed services nearby, which reduces commute times.

He said West Ashley could benefit from beautifying its roads, similar to road beautification surrounding Park Circle in North Charleston.

“There really doesn’t seem to be a comprehensive plan (for West Ashley),” Nuttall said. “If there was more density, people wouldn’t have to drive so far to get places and do things. The city of Charleston really wants to grow, and I think it’s a great spot for them to embrace it.”

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