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Moving Company James Island, SC

If you have ever moved to a new house, apartment, or office by yourself, you know how much of a pain it can be. The moving process can be filled with many different emotions. On the one hand, you're probably excited about the new adventure that lies ahead of you. On the other hand, you're probably dreading the heavy lifting, pulling, packing, organizing, and logistical aspects of moving.

At Strong Men Moving, our goal is to remove that dread so you can focus on the fun and productive times ahead. With a team of hardworking, experienced moving professionals on your side, moving to a new home or office is easy, like Sunday morning.

The best part? As local, trusted movers in James Island, you won't have to take a loan out from the bank to pay for our moving services. We believe in hard work, friendly attitudes, efficiency, and fair pricing.

Service Areas

 Local Movers James Island, SC
 Professional Movers James Island, SC

Convenience is King

Strong Men Moving is a full-service moving company in James Island. We run our trucks at 110%, meaning we go above and beyond what other movers in James Island are willing to do.

Are you moving from out of state? Is your new house hard to find? Don't have the time or patience to pack and wrap all of your belongings? Don't sweat it – we've got your back. There's no job that's too large or too small for our strong men to handle, and there's no place in the Lowcountry that we won't go for you.

When we say convenience is king, we mean it.  We're talking nights, weekends, and availability 24-hours a day from Monday through Saturday. Our goal is to make your move as stress-free and simple as possible. That way, you have time to focus on enjoying your new home or office, while we worry about hauling your double vanity into the back of our truck.

When you bring in the Strong Men, you can rest assured that you're getting a full-service, friendly experience from the minute we pull into your driveway to the minute we shake your hand goodbye. Unlike some moving companies in James Island, punctuality is not our poison. We strive to arrive on time to each job that we are hired to perform.

Here are some of the most popular moving services our customers use:

 Packers And Movers James Island, SC

Residential Moving

Along with divorce and the loss of a job, moving is listed as one of the most stressful experiences a person can go through in their lifetime. When you consider the packing, the lifting, the scheduling, and the general disruption that moving can have on your life, it's easy to understand why.

As the premier moving company in James Island, our goal is to carry your moving burden, so you can stay focused on your daily life. You can rest easy knowing our movers in James Island will always show up to your home with a positive attitude, friendly smile, and motivation to work. We treat your property like it was our own and take great care in handling all the items we move for you.

In addition, we prep our team of movers for many situations and provide thorough training on the fundamentals of moving, packing, risk management, and more.

If you own specialty items such as art, antiques, or other valuables, we will take every precaution necessary to ensure your possessions arrive to your new home safe and sound.

Whether you're moving to a new home down the street or are coming from another state, we have the experience, tools, and professional movers to do the job correctly. We even offer additional residential moving services that include packing, unpacking, overnight storage, and much more.

Call or text us today to discover the full range of our residential moving specialties.

 Moving Services James Island, SC

Labor-Only Moving

Do you already have reliable transportation but still need a team of professional movers to handle your heavy lifting? Strong Men Moving now offers labor-only moving services in James Island for both residential and commercial moving projects.

A few benefits of labor-only moving include:

  • Reduce damage - our professional movers in James Island will make sure your belongings are properly loaded into your truck, reducing the probability of damaged or broken items.
  • Maximize Space - With years of experience in the moving industry, we have a sixth sense for space-efficient packing and loading. Our strong men will make the most out of your truck's usable space, which can help reduce trip time and save money on gas.
  • Quicker Moves - A team of Strong Men Moving will almost always be able to load and unload your belongings faster than a group of your friends. It's nothing personal! With our team of professionals, you can spend less time filling up your truck and more time on getting to your new home or office.
  • Save Money - Using your friends to help you move almost certainly means you will have to compensate them one way or another. Why spend your money on cases of beer and pizza when you can use it for a safer, quicker move?
 Movers James Island, SC

Commercial Moving

James Island and the surrounding metropolitan area is a hot spot for business. Dozens of companies scout James Island each year as a new place to call home, where they can broaden their horizons and find new clients. What some businesses do not take into account is the logistics and headaches involved with moving to a new location.

Strong Men Moving has built a reputation as a leader in commercial moving services in James Island. We have the tools, team, and experience necessary to facilitate a smooth move for your business at a reasonable price.

In our experience as a commercial moving company in James Island, we have discovered that it can be complicated to move to a new business location. During this transition, we know that you need:

  • Your office furniture, equipment, and supplies packed and secured safely
  • Storage space
  • A detailed, efficient plan of action to ensure an organized move
  • Minimal disruptions to your day-to-day operations

To make sure we meet the requirements above, we will speak with you at length about your upcoming commercial business relocation. That way, we get a better understanding of the logistics involved. We will also provide you with a free quote, so you can plan your budget ahead of time.

At Strong Men Moving, some common commercial moving services include:

  • Pickup and delivery of your office equipment and supplies
  • Loading and unloading office items
  • Packing and unpacking your office supplies
  • Assembly of your office furniture
  • Provide all necessary moving equipment and packing materials

Whether you have to move a few office chairs down the street or need help transitioning to a new location, we are here to serve.

 Long Distance Moving Company James Island, SC

Refuse Removal and Disposal

Did you find a bunch of unwanted junk after moving to a new office? Do you have an old, stinky couch taking up room in your basement? Don't sweat it - we will remove the old junk from your home or office quicker than you can say, "trash it!"

With Strong Men Moving's refuse removal services, we can haul away all the heavy, unusable items that your trash service won't pick up.

A few common junk removal items that we can remove for you are:

  • Couches
  • Chairs
  • Bed frames
  • Futons
  • Dressers
  • Mattresses
 Long Distance Moving Services James Island, SC

Professional Packing

If you're like most average folks living in the U.S., you probably have hundreds of items lying around your house that need to be packed before you can move to a new home. Packing can be a massive source of frustration, especially for busy families and professionals who don't have the time or patience to pack.

Why risk a sprained back or a throbbing headache when Strong Men Moving can handle all the packing for you? With our professional packing services in James Island, you can sit back and sip some sweet tea while we pack your keepsakes, furniture, electronics, clothes, and more. If you have valuable items like family heirlooms or fragile china, we will take extra care to make sure those items stay safe and unbroken during your upcoming move.

Why hire a moving company in James Island like Strong Men Moving to help you pack? Here's why most of our clients want us to pack for them:

  • Packing is a tedious, time-consuming chore
  • Professional packing minimizes the risk of injury
  • Professional packing reduces the risk of damaged items
  • Professional packing lets you focus on the more important aspects of moving, like setting up HVAC or internet service

Don't have many items to pack this time around? Ask us about our high-quality packing supplies like boxes, tape, furniture pads, and covers. We're here to help in any way that we can!

Moving Company James Island, SC

Cleanout Services

If you have a large-scale cleanout project, we can help with that, too. Our home and commercial cleanout services are great if you need to dispose of a large number of items in a short period of time.

All you have to do is give us a call, and we'll come to your location to remove your unwanted items, taking care not to damage your home or office. Once we have removed your refuse, we'll dispose of it in an environmentally-friendly fashion to help protect the Lowcountry we love so much.

A few common cleanout services in James Island include:

  • Estate cleanouts
  • House cleanouts
  • Basement cleanouts
  • Garage cleanouts
  • Foreclosure cleanouts
  • Apartment cleanouts
  • Office cleanouts
  • Commercial space cleanouts
  • Storage space cleanouts

General Labor Services

Are you working on a project that requires a team of strong laborers? Sometimes, hiring your friends just doesn't cut it. When you need a team that arrives on time, works hard, and does so with a smile, Strong Men Moving has got the help you need! As trusted movers in James Island, we employ seasoned labor professionals that can assist you with your next indoor or outdoor project. Ready to get started? Call or text us today so that we can get a good understanding of your upcoming project, and how our team can save you time, effort, and money.

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About Strong Men Moving

Established in 2019, Strong Men Moving has quickly become a leading moving company in James Island, SC. We have built our reputation on reliability, performance, price, and a positive attitude. We truly feel privileged to serve the residents of South Carolina. Our goal is to provide quality customer service with speed and diligence to all clients. We treat all of our customers the same, whether they hire us for a multi-facility commercial move or just need help loading and unloading a moving truck.

 Local Movers James Island, SC

Strong Men Moving offers service in the following communities and beyond:

  • Bluffton
  • Charleston
  • Columbia
  • Daniel Island
  • Folly Beach
  • Greenville
  • Hanahan
  • Hilton Head Island
  • Isle of Palms
  • James Island
  • Johns Island
  • Kiawah Island
  • Ladson
  • Mount Pleasant
  • Myrtle Beach
  • Nexton
  • North Charleston
  • Seabrook Island
  • Sullivan's Island
  • Summerville
  • West Ashley

Do you have questions?

Need a quote on your upcoming residential or commercial move? We are here to help however
possible. You can reach us via phone at 843-830-6305 or by email at [email protected].

We hope to hear from you soon!

Latest News in James Island, SC

Cost to extend I-526 to James Island more than triples to $2.35 billion

The price tag for the long-planned extension of the Mark Clark Expressway from West Ashley across Johns Island to James Island has suddenly tripled.The S.C. Department of Transportation’s new construction estimate is a whopping $2.35 billion — or more than three times the projected cost when it was last calculated in 2015.The impact on Charleston County would be dramatic and those in charge have expressed concern the future of the road plan is in doubt.“I don’t know if people are going to have an ...

The price tag for the long-planned extension of the Mark Clark Expressway from West Ashley across Johns Island to James Island has suddenly tripled.

The S.C. Department of Transportation’s new construction estimate is a whopping $2.35 billion — or more than three times the projected cost when it was last calculated in 2015.

The impact on Charleston County would be dramatic and those in charge have expressed concern the future of the road plan is in doubt.

“I don’t know if people are going to have an appetite for it,” said Council Chairman Teddie Pryor. “Where are we going to get the extra money from?”

With the state’s share of the cost capped at $420 million, Charleston County had expected to contribute about $305 million to the project under the previous $725 million estimate.

Now, the county’s share would be more than $1.9 billion.

“We’ll wait to see how the county responds,” said state Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall. “Our recommendation remains ... to proceed with preliminary activity on the project and get to the point where it would be shovel-ready.”

In a letter to the county April 25, Hall said DOT is asking the county and the state Transportation Infrastructure Bank Board for approval to spend $150 million for ongoing work to make the road plan ready for bids. The county would pay half that amount.

Beyond that, the highway department wants to county to demonstrate “a reasonable financial approach to the entire project.”

Pryor said the County Council will discuss the issue when it meets at a regularly scheduled meeting at 5 p.m. today, April 26. He said the county would likely need federal assistance, new taxes, or both, in order to fund such a project.

The county and the state have each spent about $12.5 million on the project so far, he said.

“The longer this thing is delayed, the more it’s going to cost,” said Pryor.

Hall said one reason the cost has gone up so much is the soaring price of real estate in Charleston County. Acquiring the land needed for the road would cost an estimated $261 million, she said.

The DOT estimate assumes construction could begin in 2028, and also assumes there would be two or three years of litigation before that.

If completed, there would be a highway loop around Charleston, with the interstate running from Mount Pleasant across Daniel Island, North Charleston and West Ashley, then becoming more of a parkway across Johns Island and connecting to the James Island Connector on James Island.

This is a developing story and will be updated.

Deputies working to determine if Mosquito Beach fire was intentionally set

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Detectives are investigating suspicious circumstances surrounding a fire that destroyed a historic hotel on Mosquito Beach Friday.Deputies responded to the fire Friday at approximately 3:30 p.m. in the 2200 block of Mosquito Beach where a former hotel was on fire, an incident report states. The building was the former Pine Tree Hotel which served African Americans during segregation.Sheriff’s office spokesman Andrew Knapp said witnesses’ statements indicating “a suspicious nature&rd...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Detectives are investigating suspicious circumstances surrounding a fire that destroyed a historic hotel on Mosquito Beach Friday.

Deputies responded to the fire Friday at approximately 3:30 p.m. in the 2200 block of Mosquito Beach where a former hotel was on fire, an incident report states. The building was the former Pine Tree Hotel which served African Americans during segregation.

Sheriff’s office spokesman Andrew Knapp said witnesses’ statements indicating “a suspicious nature” of the fire led them to assign detectives to investigate.

The incident report states investigators also found footprints around the building.

While they are continuing to examine the scene and follow leads, Knapp said they have not yet determined whether the fire was intentionally set.

The Pine Tree Hotel was built in 1962 to provide accommodations primarily for African American tourists coming to Mosquito Beach, according to the Historic Charleston Foundation.

“At that time, it was during the Jim Crow era of the American South. Folly Beach was segregated it was whites only,” HCF Properties Manager Justin Schwebler said. “African Americans really needed places where they could go and recreate along the coast and Mosquito Beach was one of those places.”

The hotel was in operation for 20 years until the 1980s when it was damaged during a hurricane and fell into disrepair.

The hotel was going to be restored through a grant from the National Park Service.

Schwebler said the project got approval on Thursday from Charleston County, the day before the fire. Friday morning was supposed to be the last day of deconstruction of the building. Schwebler said that because the hotel was in a degraded state, they were working on dismantling it and salvaging as much historic material as they could.

Bill “Cubby” Wilder is the owner of the Pine Tree Hotel.

“It’s a tragedy that somebody or something decided to put a torch to it,” Wilder said. “I was devastated when I heard the news that the motel was on fire.”

Schwebler said much of the salvaged material is still intact, so they will be able to go through with reconstructing it.

“We went through hurricanes, we went through all sorts of things,” Mosquito Beach Project Manager Kyle Taylor said. “This fire’s not gonna stop anything.”

The building was unoccupied at the time of the fire and no injuries were reported.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

SC DHEC board adds new stipulation to permit for planned Point Farm mitigation bank

WADMALAW ISLAND — Developers of a wetlands mitigation bank on this sea island must now submit a sediment sampling plan for approval by the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control in order to receive a permit.The permit was already approved by DHEC’s staff, but environmentalists and Wadmalaw Island residents asked the agency to review the document and reverse the choice to let the work go forward.Mitigation banks are private commercial entities meant to offset wetland destruction. While federal law requir...

WADMALAW ISLAND — Developers of a wetlands mitigation bank on this sea island must now submit a sediment sampling plan for approval by the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control in order to receive a permit.

The permit was already approved by DHEC’s staff, but environmentalists and Wadmalaw Island residents asked the agency to review the document and reverse the choice to let the work go forward.

Mitigation banks are private commercial entities meant to offset wetland destruction. While federal law requires building projects to avoid harming wetlands, when that is not possible, developers must pay to create more wetlands in the same watershed where the old ones were destroyed.

The banks do the work in advance, and entities can buy credits from them equal to the amount of the lost wetlands.

One concern is that this project near the Leadenwah Creek would introduce salt into a freshwater habitat used by a number of animals, including the threatened American wood stork.

The plan by Point Farm MB LLC is meant to enhance and restore tidal salt marsh on more than 2,000 acres in Charleston County, the company said in a permit application to the state. It expects to remove earthen dikes that have held back ocean water from fresh wetlands.

The proposal would change a salty pond to tidal salt marsh, turn 10.14 acres of freshwater impoundments brackish, and expand 20.60 acres of tidal salt marsh and creeks into currently impounded ponds.

Following a final review conference on May 5, the DHEC board voted to support its staff’s initial decision, but with a special condition: The developers must now submit a sediment sampling plan for the department’s approval.

Environmentalists are concerned that there hasn’t been any soil or sediment testing to determine if there are any pollutants that went into the holding ponds for the 50 to 60 years they were used for agricultural purposes.

Point Farm already has plans to drain the ponds for testing before construction begins there, said Ross Nelson, president of American Mitigation Co., the firm that represents Point Farm.

“We want to drain everything out and make sure the sediments are right and in place and that they’re ready for planting before we start removing the berms,” Nelson said at the DHEC board meeting May 5.

If testing is done and it is determined the sediment contains toxins, they should be removed, said Dr. Joe Kelley, a former biology professor at The Citadel.

“If it turns out that the sediments are not highly contaminated, then that’s what we hope for,” Kelley said. The best case would be a freshwater pond that provides good habitat for birds and other organizations, he said.

Wadmalaw Island contains very little fresh water. The limited freshwater wetlands on the island have functioned for hundreds of years as important habitats for wading birds and other wildlife, said Jason Crowley, Coastal Conservation League’s communities and transportation senior program director.

“And why would you want to lose that?” Kelley said at the board meeting on May 5.

Wadmalaw Island residents and environmentalists are also concerned that by only protecting a 50-foot strip of high ground next to the marshy mitigation bank, the property would be at risk of stormwater runoff if development happens close by, Crowley said.

Another concern covers the low-lying area’s susceptibility to sea level rise and marsh migration. Crowley said the narrow buffer won’t allow the marsh to move far as sea levels rise.

The vote on May 5 puts further stipulations on the planned mitigation that has already hit other roadblocks. Plans for the bank were stalled April 4 when the Charleston County Board of Zoning Appeals denied two variance requests for the project.

Point Farm Investors LLC wanted the board to approve the removal of a grand live oak tree and allow encroachment into 1.3 acres of protected buffer next to tidal land. But the board voted unanimously to deny both requests because the property could still be used without variances.

The bank cannot be opened without the zoning permissions because of areas on the property where developers would have to breach berms that block tidal flow from coming in, said attorney Mary Shahid, who spoke on behalf of the bank at the BZA meeting on April 4.

Nelson, the American Mitigation Co. president, is a BZA member, and was appointed by Charleston County Councilwoman Jenny Honeycutt.

“If we could get maybe some clarification on what zoning amendments might need to be made to address any of that, I would appreciate a response,” Honeycutt said at a County Council meeting last month.

The bank’s developers have the right to appeal the zoning board’s decision to deny the variance request.

The planned bank already has support from Charleston County, although it is uncertain if the project will move forward. The county has paid at least $14.8 million to reserve credits from the bank.

A copy of the county’s Aug. 31, 2021, agreement with Point Farm MB and American Mitigation Co., said it bought into the bank to offset salt marsh impacts from transportation projects. Among those projects is the planned extension of Interstate 526 through Johns and James islands.

The county committed to buy 440 salt marsh mitigation credits at $45,000 each, according to a purchase agreement signed by County Council Chairman Teddie Pryor.

A deposit of $14,850,000, or 75 percent of the total purchase price, was due within 30 days of the effective date of the agreement to reserve the credits. County spokeswoman Kelsey Barlow confirmed April 7 the money has already been paid.

Barlow said the county was working on a path forward regarding the Board of Zoning Appeals’ decision.

The agreement said if the bank fails to have access to the mitigation credits, the seller is required to return the county’s deposit, in addition to all other payments made to the bank. This does not include payments made for credits already purchased and transferred to the county, but it’s unclear if any of them have been delivered.

Thursday headlines: S.C. House kills medical marijuana bill

S.C. House Speaker Pro Tem Tommy Pope, R-Rock Hill, shot down a medical marijuana bill by S.C. Sen. Tom Davis, R-Beaufort, by ruling a 6% fee on medical marijuana sales creates a new tax. That power only is allowed under the state constitution by a bill that originates in the House, according to this story. The bill originated in the state Senate, where Davis has been fighting to pass the ...

S.C. House Speaker Pro Tem Tommy Pope, R-Rock Hill, shot down a medical marijuana bill by S.C. Sen. Tom Davis, R-Beaufort, by ruling a 6% fee on medical marijuana sales creates a new tax. That power only is allowed under the state constitution by a bill that originates in the House, according to this story. The bill originated in the state Senate, where Davis has been fighting to pass the compassionate care bill for seven years.

In other South Carolina news:

Crowd rallies for pro-choice in downtown Charleston. In light of the U.S. Supreme Court’s leaked draft opinion on overturning the landmark Roe v. Wade abortion case, at least 200 advocates, including Planned Parenthood and Charleston Black Lives Matters representatives, rallied in downtown Charleston Wednesday night.

Former bank CEO indicted in Murdaugh case. Former Palmetto State Bank CEO Russell Laffitte was accused of 21 charges by the State Grand Jury Wednesday related to disgraced attorney Alex Murdaugh. Lafitte was indicted for conspiring to steal roughly hundreds of thousands of dollars in settlement proceeds owed to the family of a deaf man who was left severely disabled after a 2009 car accident. The indictments come four months after the bank ousted him as CEO for his involvement with Murdaugh.

Airbnb to filter partygoers in Charleston for Memorial Day. Airbnb said it planned to prevent parties in Airbnb renter’s homes on Memorial Weekend in Charleston by restricting one- to two-day rentals being made by users with bad reviews.

Charleston nonprofit working to unearth sunken vessel. A group of young professionals is partnering with nonprofit group Wounded Nature Working Veterans to retrieve a sunken vessel in the Charleston harbor. The vessel, the group says, causes damage to the area near the James Island Connector and makes it dangerous for boaters sailing in and out. The two groups are looking to raise $15,000 to help retrieve the boat.

Lowcountry wedding industry back in full swing. The Wedding Report predicts nearly 2.5 million U.S. weddings in 2022, the highest number since 1984. Local businesses like Taylor Jordan Photography and Patrick Properties Hospitality Group have seen an increase in business after two years of the pandemic. Officials say weddings in North Charleston make a positive impact to the city, as the national average cost of a wedding is $32,000.

Carolina Squat vehicle modification is one step closer to being banned. The S.C. House unanimously voted on Wednesday to ban vehicle modifications like the “Carolina Squat,” a modification in which the front end of a truck or SUV being placed higher than the back end, from roadways. If the bill becomes law, vehicles will be prohibited from raising four or more inches above the height of the rear fender.

To get dozens of South Carolina news stories every business day, contact the folks at SC Clips.

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South Carolina Supreme Court returns 14 congregations to Episcopal diocese

[Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina] The South Carolina Supreme Court ruled April 20 that 14 South Carolina churches that were once part of The Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina shall be returned, along with all real and personal property held in trust for the diocese, including the St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center on Seabrook Island.The churches left the diocese in 2012 and later joined the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) and the April 20 news marks another milestone in a nearly decade-lo...

[Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina] The South Carolina Supreme Court ruled April 20 that 14 South Carolina churches that were once part of The Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina shall be returned, along with all real and personal property held in trust for the diocese, including the St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center on Seabrook Island.

The churches left the diocese in 2012 and later joined the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA) and the April 20 news marks another milestone in a nearly decade-long legal journey that included a lower court decision in 2014 which was largely overturned by the state’s high court in 2017 and then further clarified with the decision this week.

Of the decision, the Rt. Rev. Ruth Woodliff-Stanley, bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina, said: “Their decisions will no doubt bring joy to many in our diocese, but for others, there will be grief in the possible finality of a loss they have been feeling for nearly 10 years.” She also added a hope for the future of the reconciled diocese: “We now walk into a bright future, one in which we will focus on the reconciling power of the Gospel to transform injustice, to heal the brokenhearted, and to build God’s beloved community.”

The South Carolina Supreme Court, using a variety of determining factors, decided that 14 parishes (of the 29 previously named) did create an “irrevocable trust in favor of the National Church and its diocese” (the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina – the “Associated Diocese”). These 14 parishes are as follows: Christ Church, Mt. Pleasant; Good Shepherd, Charleston; Holy Comforter, Sumter; Holy Cross, Stateburg; Holy Trinity, Charleston; St. Bartholomew’s, Hartsville; St. David’s, Cheraw; St. Luke’s, Hilton Head; St. Matthew’s, Fort Motte; St. James, Charleston; St. John’s, Johns Island; St. Jude’s, Walterboro; Trinity, Myrtle Beach; and Old St. Andrew’s, Charleston.

Conversely, the Court found that 15 of the 29 parishes “did not create a trust in favor of the National Church or its diocese, and thus those 15 Parishes retain title to their real estate.” These parishes are as follows: All Saints, Florence; Church of our Saviour, John’s Island; Church of the Cross, Bluffton; Christ-St. Paul’s, Yonges Island; Epiphany, Eutawville; Redeemer, Orangeburg; Resurrection, Surfside/Myrtle Beach; St. Helena’s, Beaufort; St. Paul’s, Bennettsville; St. Paul’s, Summerville; St. Philip’s, Charleston; St. Luke & St. Paul, Charleston; St. Michael’s, Charleston; Trinity, Edisto; and Trinity, Pinopolis.

The South Carolina Supreme Court has decided that all real and personal property, including the St. Christopher Camp and Conference Center, have been held “in trust for the benefit of the National Church [The Episcopal Church] and the Associated Diocese,” meaning the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina. The ruling further concluded that “the real and personal property held in trust by the Trustees is now held for the benefit of the Associated Diocese.”

On all matters and questions relating to “names, styles, emblems, and service marks,” the Court deferred to the federal court. The U.S. District Court previously ruled in favor of The Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina (also recognized as The Episcopal Church in South Carolina) in September 2019. This decision has been appealed, but any future rulings were stayed pending the outcome of this state case.

In her pastoral letter to the diocese sent hours after receiving the opinion, Woodlff-Stanley discussed the next steps for the diocese. “We are still working to understand the immediate path forward and promise to be in communication with you as our legal team helps us determine what comes next,” said Woodliff-Stanley. “May we focus together on reconciliation and the way of love as we journey together on the road ahead, centered in Christ’s love for all of us.”

The Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina was one of the nine original dioceses that formed The Episcopal Church in 1785. The Episcopal Church, which encompasses 111 dioceses and regional areas in 17 nations of the world, remains the only denomination in the United States affiliated with the worldwide Anglican Communion.

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